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1987 Honda Accord Hatchback

Here we have a 1987 Honda Accord hatchback, the last generation for 30 years.  Honda is now releasing a new 2018 Honda Accord Hatchback.  This is a fitting example of a 3 decade hatchback resurrection.  Are hatchbacks making a comeback? Will station wagons be next?

And check out some previous Honda vehicle’s we’ve showcased.

1990 Honda CRX

Some info via Wikipedia:

At its introduction in 1985, it won the Car of the Year Japan Award.
The third generation Accord became the first Honda to employ double wishbones at both the front and rear ends. While more expensive than competitors’ MacPherson strut systems, this setup provided better stability and sharper handling for the vehicle. All had front sway bars and upper models had rear sway bars as well. Brakes were either small all-wheel discs with twin-piston calipers (only available on the Japanese-market 2.0-Si model), larger all-wheel discs with single piston calipers, or a front disc/rear drum system. ABS was available as an option on the 4-wheel disc brake models, though not in North America. Base model Accords rode on 13-inch steel wheels with hubcaps with more expensive models having the option of 14-inch alloy wheels.
The Accord’s available engines varied depending on its market: Japan received the A18A, A20A, B18A, B20A and A20A3; Europe received the A16A1, A20A1, A20A2, A20A3, A20A4, B20A2, and B20A8; Australia received A20A2 and A20A4; other regions received A16A1 and A20A2; while North America received the A20A1 and A20A3. On Accord 1986 model year engine block was marked as BS and BT in USA, BS1 and BT1 in Canada, this cars had chassis code BA. Since 1987 the engine block in Indonesia was marked as NA instead of A20A2. In Japan, the introduction of a 2.0 litre engine obligated Japanese drivers to pay a higher amount of annual road tax compared to the last two previous generations, pushing the Accord into the luxury category in Japan.
The Accord’s trim levels ranged from spartan to luxurious. In the Japanese home market, the Accord was available with a full power package, heated mirrors (optional), a digital instrument cluster (optional), sunroof (optional), cruise control, and climate control (which was also optional). Some North European export models also had heated front seats and head light washers. North American and Australian Accords were not available with most of these options, presumably (and in the U.S. in particular) because Honda was seen as a builder of economy cars, and not to cannibalize sales from the recently introduced Acura line.

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