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1977 Pontiac Trans Am

You’re cruising down the freeway, T-tops down with the crisp air blowing all around you.  The sun trickles in through the tree canopy as the speedometer needle reaches for another peg.  Your Trans-Am engine rumbles as you cross past a brightly colored billboard.  Your sense heighten, your hair stands on end as your rear-view mirror illuminates blue and red. SHIT!!! It’s the Five-Oh… the Police. You hit the GO pedal with all your might, slamming it to the floor as the transmission downshifts and the V8 roars to life.  You fly down the open country road as the police interceptor becomes a small dot behind you.

Remember the movie “Smokey and the Bandit”? That was a brief intro to get you fired up for the car we spotted today.  While not the iconic Black and Gold Pontiac Trans Am from the movie, the Trans Am we spotted still conjures up images from the movie: 1970’s bravado, chest hair and bell bottom jeans. Now where is the Snowman?!?

Enjoy this spotting, with more to come! And don’t forget to check out other classic Pontiac’s we’ve spotted.

1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

1969 Pontiac GTO

1982 Pontiac Firebird

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

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1985 Ford Bronco II

What do we have here? A 1985 Ford Bronco II.

Back to normal car spotting you say? You bet – finishing out the year strong.

This Bronco II is sporting a “custom” grille and what looks to be Ford Explorer rims, although I can’t be certain.

I’ll have a video out of this car before the end of the year. It will be a trial run of what I want to do for 2019. Enjoy.

 

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1985 JDM Nascar Toyota Pickup

I don’t know what is going on with this truck but I kind of like it.  It is a mash-up of many different styles, almost as if somebody pulled different modification choices from a hat. It’s a JDM Nascar pickup truck and I dig it’s uniqueness. Bravo to it’s indecisive owner.

And check out some other Toyota Pickups we’ve spotted:

1976 Toyota Pickup Truck

1982 Toyota 4×4 Pickup

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1963 Ford Falcon Coupe

Check out this 1963 Ford Falcon Coupe spotted in Silverlake.  I am a big fan of the Falcon model, especially the first generation such as this one.  Did you know:  The Falcon line was one of Ford’s first mass-produced vehicle that was a unibody design instead of a body on frame?  Most interesting.

Check out other Falcon’s and Falcon variants we have spotted:

1961 Ford Falcon Coupe

Early 60’s Ford Ranchero

1963 Mercury Meteor Custom

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1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1

The 1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1 – second generation.  The Mach 1 nomenclature denotes the special performance version of Mustangs from a time long past. In my opinion, the second generation is not as handsome as the first gen, but this example is in such great condition it is hard to not stare. However, the hood pin was dangling precariously about which did not seem in character with this car. Enjoy some pics!

Check out some other Mustangs we have featured:

1968 Ford Mustang Coupe

Some info via wiki:

The Ford Mustang was successfully introduced in April 1964 as a sporty “pony car” to attract younger buyers into Ford products. After a few years of development, Ford saw the need to create performance Mustangs to compete with GM and their release of the Chevrolet Camaro and Pontiac Firebird.
As the performance war continued, the Mustang’s platform and engine bay were progressively redesigned to accommodate larger engine blocks. Late in the 1968 model year, Ford introduced the 428 cu in (7.0 L) Cobra Jet FE engine in a small group of Mustang GTs and into the 1968 Shelby GT500KR. This was a strong performer and indicated the direction of the 1969 Mustang. However, “GT” wasn’t a name that would initiate images of street screeching performance; hence the introduction of the Mach 1 title.

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End of Month Hodgepodge – June 2017

It’s the end of the month and that can only mean one thing –  Los Angeles Car Spotting photo Hodgepodge.  We compile all the automobiles that didn’t get featured this month but still deserve an honorable mention. Enjoy!

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Spotted a 1973 Dodge Charger (Third Gen)

Spotted this hard-to-miss Dodge Charger in Silverlake at Sunset Junction. While it is not the 1970 Dodge Charger made (even more) iconic by the Fast and Furious franchise, this 1973 Charger still demands attention. Looking mostly un-restored, this Charger transports you to a by-gone era of go fast, who-gives-a-shit-about-emissions automotive excellence.

And of course, some info for ya’ll from Wiki:

During the early-1960s, automakers were exploring new ideas in the personal luxury and specialty car segments. Chrysler, fast to enter the specialty car market, selected their Dodge Division to enter the marketplace with a bigger model to fit between the “pony car” Ford Mustang and the “personal luxury” Ford Thunderbird. The intention was to use the mid-size B-body for a sporty car with fastback look while sharing as much of their existing hardware as possible.
For the 1973 model year, Chargers received new sheet metal (though at first glance only the rear roof “C-Pillars” looked different) and were in fact longer, wider, and slightly taller than the 1971-72 cars. Also new were vertically slatted taillights and new grilles. Hidden headlights were dropped, even as an option. The 318 was still standard, with the 340 (available only on the Rallye), 360 (2-barrel only), 400 (low power 2-barrel/single exhaust and high performance 4-barrel/dual exhaust) and 440 remaining as options. The SE models had a new roof treatment that had a “triple opera window” surrounded by a canopy-style vinyl roof. All other models had a new quarter window treatment, discontinuing its AMC Gremlin-style window in favor of a more conventional design. Total sales this year were around 108,000 units, the highest ever for the 1971-74 Charger generation, though more than 60 percent of the cars had the non-high performance engines. The 1973 Chargers, and all Chrysler products, were equipped with 5 mph bumpers, front and rear.

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1984 Audi 5000 S (C3 – Audi 100)

The ought forgotten Audi 5000 series was a transitional period for Audi, with humdrum styling and nothing to note in the performance department. Yet this vehicle was on Car and Driver’s Ten Best list for 1984 and 1985. Over 30 years later, this Audi 5000 still holds it’s head high as it meanders through the streets of Los Angeles searching for grocery parking lots.

Some information about the Audi 5000/100 via Wikipedia:

The Audi 100 and Audi 200 are four-door, front-engine, front- or all-wheel drive full-size/executive sedans manufactured and marketed by the Audi division of the Volkswagen Group for model years 1968 through 1994 — across four generations (C1-C4), with a two-door model available in the first and second generation (C1-2) and a five-door wagon available in the third (C3) generation.
The third generation Audi 100/5000 was widely noted for its advanced aerodynamic design solutions, which included pin-located, flush side windows — and achieved a drag coefficient of 0.30.
The C2 and C3 models of the Audi 100 were marketed initially in the United States as the Audi 5000 (1984-1988) and in South Africa as the Audi 500.

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1971 Buick Skylark Hardtop Coupe

Good morning and welcome to another LACS post featuring a 1971 Buick Skylark Coupe.  This skylark looks to be mostly factory and originally sported a small block V8 under the hood.  It looks quite monochrome in it’s faded grey. Enjoy pics and check out previous posts featuring Skylarks below.

 

Buick Skylark 1

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1967 Cadillac Sedan De Ville

Look… at… this… BOAT of a car!  The Cadillac Sedan De Ville is an absolutely massive car. It was difficult to capture this vehicle in frame with my 50mm lens! You have to see this in person to appreciate the grander of the third generation Cadillac De Ville. Also note the muted paint color and the factory rear wheel well covers on this car – absolutely perfect.

Some info via Wikipedia about the 1967 Cadillac De Ville Sedan:

The 1967 DeVilles were extensively restyled. Prominent styling features were given a powerful frontal appearance with forward-leaning front end, long, sculptured body lines, and redefined rear fenders that had more than just a hint of tail fins in them. The full-width, forward-thrusted “eggcrate” grille was flanked by dual stacked headlights for the third consecutive year. The squarer cornered grille insert had blades that seemed to emphasize its vertical members and it appeared both above the bumper and through a horizontal slot cut into it. Rectangular parking lamps were built into the outer edges of the grille. Rear end styling revisions were highlighted by metal divided tail lamps and a painted lower bumper section.
As it had been since DeVille became a separate series, DeVille denoted Cadillac’s mainstream model, falling between the Calais (which had replaced the Series 62) and the Sixty Special and Eldorado. The DeVille was redesigned for 1965 but rode on the same 129.5-inch (3,290 mm) wheelbase. Tailfins were canted slightly downward, and sharp, distinct body lines replaced the rounded look. Also new were a straight rear bumper and vertical lamp clusters. The headlight pairs switched from horizontal to vertical, thus permitting a wider grille. Curved frameless side windows appeared, and convertibles acquired tempered glass backlights. New standard features included lamps for luggage, glove and rear passenger compartments and front and rear safety belts. Power was still supplied by the 340 horsepower 429 cu in (7,030 cc) V8, which would be replaced by the 472 cu in (7,730 cc) for 1968. Perimeter frame construction allowed repositioning the engine six inches forward in the frame, thus lowering the transmission hump and increasing interior room.

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