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1972 Chevy Monte Carlo

Hello everyone and apologies for the hiatus.  Spotted this flat black 1972 Chevy Monte Carlo just yesterday around Hollywood.  I think the Monte Carlo is an underrated American classic that has great styling and poise. This one benefits from upgraded rims and tires, sporting appropriate white sidewall lettering. Enjoy

And check out some previous Chevy’s from this era:

1971 Chevy Monte Carlo (1st Gen)

1965 Chevy Chevelle SS (Malibu)

1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

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1970 Cadillac DeVille

Happy Labor Day everyone! I hope you all are enjoying your holiday, whether you get to relax with friends and family or if you have to work.

Spotted this beautiful Cadillac Sedan parked near Venice, CA.  I believe it is the DeVille model but it might also be the Fleetwood.  Let me know – how can one tell the difference?  It may lack the finish and polish of a restored version, but this Caddy still has flair and I love the body lines. Enjoy

Check out some other Cadillac’s we’ve spotted:

1958 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham

1967 Cadillac Sedan De Ville

1977 Cadillac DeVille Sedan

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1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

Spotted this transitional Pontiac Bonneville in Mid-Wilshire.  I call this year the transitional year for the Bonneville since it was the year between the beautiful designs of the 1960’s and 1950’s and the years after.  I do not need to tell you that Bonneville’s from 1971 and onward were not the pinnacle of automotive design. This one is sporting a massive 455 (7.5L) GM motor under the hood that supposedly was rated at 370 HP. That is a lot of horsepower – although this behemoth needed it to move about. Whether those were gross (read – bench test) 1970 numbers is up for debate.

Check out some other Pontiac’s we’ve spotted:

1965 Pontiac Bonneville

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

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1971 Chevy Nova Sedan

Spotted this vivid off-white Chevy Nova in Silverlake area of Los Angeles on a sun filled walk around the local reservoir.  The sedan’s are not the most sought after Nova’s, but the combination of the color and wheels on this one make it especially appealing.  It’s a shame this otherwise very clean car has had a “love tap” on the rear bumper.  Let’s say it just adds to the character!

And check out some other Nova’s we’ve spotted:

1967 Chevy Nova SS w/ Blower

1973 Chevrolet Nova

1974 Chevrolet Nova Sedan

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1971 Chevy Monte Carlo (1st Gen)

First generation Chevrolet Monte Carlo – the first Monte Carlo we’ve spotted.  Instead of whimsical banter about cars, check out these links for other forms of the name and term “Monte Carlo”.

The Monte Carlo Method

Monte Carlo Alogrithm

Monte Carlo (part of Monaco)

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2012 Chevy Corvette ZR-1

Spotted this handsome C6 Corvette ZR-1 in a Metallic Gray just the other day. Posted up somewhere in Culver City, I’m glad to see someone is driving this to the office.

On a side note, have you all heard all the buzz about cryptocurrency, blockchain and Bitcoin? I read an article the other day about how stock prices of seemingly small unheard-of companies are skyrocketing at the mention of implementing “blockchain technology”.

I got to thinking, if I say blockchain and bitcoin enough, will my views skyrocket? If i change my blog name to “blockchain car spotting”, will I see 2,500% viewership gains?  Let’s find out: blockchain blockchain blockchain blockchain.

All kidding aside, look at this ZR-1.

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1987 Ford Country Squire station wagon

Yeeehawww! Something about the name ‘Country Squire’ just makes me want to jump straight into a Western movie with my six shooter and wrangling some livestock.  Maybe that’s the feeling Ford was trying to evoke with the name and format of the mid 1980’s Ford Country Squire.  Whatever their purpose with the naming mechanism was, they pulled it off with a long roof and faux wood paneling flanking the sides of the ‘Country Squire’.  Long live the station wagons.

Check out previous station wagons that we’ve spotted:

1994 Buick Roadmaster Wagon

1970 Ford Galaxie Station Wagon

1988 Chevy Caprice Classic Wagon

Don’t forget to read up on the seventh generation Country Squire wagon by Ford via our favorite free online encyclopedia, Wikipedia:

CLICK HERE for that info (opens in new window).

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1970 Ford Galaxie Station Wagon

A blast from the past – a Ford Galaxie Station wagon from 1970.  Imagine the nuclear family loading up this beast for a trip to the shore or into the mountains to camp.  Yuum, smell the s’mores!

1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (1)1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (2)1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (3)

Check out our previous posts with the Galaxie and/or Ford 500:

1967 Ford Fairlane 500

 

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1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

LACS fans and blog visitors – it has been too long and I apologize!  The film industry has been keeping me busy non-stop and leaves little time for fun activities like car spotting.  To start us back up after a hiatus, we have a 1974 Chevy Camaro spotted in Silverlake sporting some nice polished Crager rims.

1974 Chevy Camaro (1)1974 Chevy Camaro (2)

Check out some other Camaro’s spotted in Los Angeles:

1978 Chevy Camaro

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327


Some info about the 2nd gen Camaro:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro.
Dubbed “Super Hugger”, the second-generation Camaro was developed without the rush of the first generation and benefited from a greater budget justified by the success of the first generation.[citation needed] Although it was an all-new car, the basic mechanical layout of the new Camaro was familiar, engineered much like its predecessor with a unibody structure utilizing a front subframe, A-arm and coil spring front suspension, and rear leaf springs. The chassis and suspension of the second generation were greatly refined in both performance and comfort; base models offered significant advances in sound-proofing, ride isolation, and road-holding.
Extensive experience Chevrolet engineers had gained racing the first-generation led directly to advances in second-generation Camaro steering, braking, and balance. Although it began its run with a number of high-performance configurations, as the 1970s progressed, the Camaro grew less powerful, succumbing, like many production cars of the era, to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis. Major styling changes were made in 1974 and 1978; 1981 was the final model year for the second-generation Camaro.

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1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

Another beautifully orange classic car spotted in Los Angeles (Venice to be specific).  This one is the Third Generation Chevrolet Corvette Stingray (C3).  Our spotted Corvette is in spectacular shape and appears to be rocking the original rims and trunk mounted luggage rack (love this option). Check out this C2 Stingray we’ve feature in the past. Enjoy!

Some information via Wikipedia:

1973 started Corvette’s transformation from muscle to touring sports car. A Chevrolet advertisement headlined: “We gave it radials, a quieter ride, guard beams and a nose job.”
Two 350 cu in (5.7 L) small block engines were available. The base L-48 engine produced 190 hp (142 kW). The L-82 was introduced as the optional high performance small-block engine (replacing the LT-1 engine) and delivered 250 hp (186 kW). The new hydraulic lifter motor featured a forged steel crankshaft, running in a four-bolt main block, with special rods, impact extruded pistons, a higher lift camshaft, mated to special heads with larger valves running at a higher 9:1 compression, and included finned aluminum valve covers to help dissipate heat. The L-82 was designed to come on strong at higher RPM[16] and ordered with nearly 20% of the cars at a cost of $299.[6]
Car and Driver on the L-82 in December 1972, “…when it comes to making a choice, the L82 is the engine we prefer. Duntov and the other Corvette engineers gravitate toward the big blocks because they like the torque. And granted, the 454s will squirt through traffic with just a feather touch on the gas pedal. But, to us at least, the small block engine contributes to a fine sense of balance in the Corvette that is rare in any GT car, so rare that it would be a shame to exchange it for a few lb.-ft. of torque.”
The 454 cu in (7.4 L) LS-4 big-block V8 engine was offered delivering 275 hp (205 kW) and 15% of the cars were ordered so equipped. “454” emblems adorned the hood of big-block equipped Corvettes. All models featured a new cowl induction domed hood, which pulled air in through a rear hood intake into the engine compartment under full throttle, increasing power (but didn’t show up in the horsepower ratings). 0-60 times were reduced by a second while keeping the engine compartment cooler.

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1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible

The 1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible is the story of a changing landscape for American  muscle car.  The transition from big power and arguably beautiful styling to emission restricted motors and subdued architecture. This 1971 Cougar bridges the gap between the times and does so wonderfully. Enjoy.

Some info about the Cougar:

For 1971, the Cougar was restyled, weighed less, and had only a one-inch-longer wheelbase than its predecessors (112 vs. 111 – which was similar to GM’s intermediate-sized two-door models, such as the Olds Cutlass). The front end now featured four exposed headlights; the disappearing headlights were eliminated. The center grille piece was now larger, sharing its appearance with the 1971 Mercury Cyclone. The rear featured a semifastback with a “flying buttress” sail-panel. The convertible returned, as did the XR-7 and the GT package. The Eliminator package was dropped, but the Ram Air option remained. The engine lineup was revised for 1971, as well. Now only three engines were offered—the standard 240 hp (179 kW) 351 Windsor two-barrel V8, the 285 hp (213 kW) 351 Cleveland four-barrel V8, and the 370 hp (276 kW) 429 Cobra Jet four-barrel V8.
By 1972, the climate had begun to change as the muscle car era ended. No longer able to use gross power numbers, the manufacturers had to use net power figures, which dropped the once-mighty figures down substantially. Engines were shuffled around a bit with the 429 engine option no longer available. They were now the standard 163 hp (122 kW) 351 Cleveland two-barrel V8, or the 266 hp (198 kW) 351C four-barrel Cobra Jet V8. Other than that, the Cougar remained a carryover from 1971. Only minor trim details were changed in 1972. The big-block engines were gone for 1972 and 1973. The days of performance-oriented muscle cars were coming to an end.

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