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1972 Jeep J2000 Truck

Here we have spotted a 1972 Jeep J2000, previously known as the Jeep Gladiator up until 1971.  There is a V8 badge on the side of the truck, so my guess is that is has the 5.0L AMC V8 under the hood.  I especially like the Orange paint job with the white rims.

And check out some other Jeep’s we have spotted:

1982 Jeep CJ-7

1989 Jeep Grand Wagoneer

1989 Jeep Grand Wagoneer

Enjoy

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1972 Chevrolet C10 pickup (CK Chassis)

Spotted another Chevy draped in blue on the same block as the 1969 Chevy Impala the other day.  By the looks of it, this Chevy C10 Pickup has been recently repainted and restored.  Even the chrome was in great shape! Almost look as if it came off the showroom floor.  And it has some of my favorite period wheels; the moonie style wheels! Enjoy

And don’t forget to check out other Chevy Pickups we’ve spotted:

1960 Chevy C-10 Fleetside Pickup

1958 Chevy Apache Pickup Truck

1967 Chevrolet C-10 Pickup Truck

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1977 Honda CVCC

Here on display is a Honda CVCC from the mid to late 1970’s.  The acronym CVCC stands for “Compound Vortex Controlled Combustion” and was introduced from Honda as a reduced emissions engine. This little Honda is basically a Civic, but received a model name that was the same as the engine name.  I wonder how many other manufacturers have named the car model the same as the engine?

Check out some other Honda’s we’ve spotted:

1979 Honda Accord Hatch

1987 Honda Accord Hatchback

1990 Honda CRX

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1982 Toyota 4×4 Pickup

Toyota Pickup trucks are a popular breed in Southern California.  As with many of the vehicles roaming LA streets, this Toyota enjoys sunny weather and no snow.  And unless you are close to the beach, that means no salt and no rust. This one is a clean example of Toyota’s iteration of the 4×4 pickup from the early 1980’s. It appears to be repainted and I wouldn’t doubt this has been restored very recently. I can’t really pinpoint this color –  any opinions?

Also check out previous Toyota 4×4 vehicles we have spotted:

1984 Toyota 4Runner (N60)

1988 Toyota Land Cruiser

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1983 Mercedes-Benz 300TD Wagon (W123)

Wagons – revered by many in the enthusiast community and loathed by some.  The long roof station wagon from is a personal favorite of mine and thus earns a spot in any LA Car Spotting post.  Here we have a beautifully blue early 80’s Mercedes 300TD (Turbo Diesel) Wagon with the W123 Chassis Code.

Some information via Wiki on the Mercedes 300TD

The first Mercedes turbo diesel production W123 appeared in September, 1979. This was the 300 TD Turbodiesel, available with automatic transmission only. In most markets, the turbocharged 5-cylinder 3-litre diesel engine (Type OM617) was offered only in the T body style, while in North America it was also available in saloon and coupé guises.
In September 1982, all models received a mild facelift. The rectangular headlights, previously fitted only to the 280/280E, were standardized across the board, as was power steering. Since February 1982, an optional five-speed manual transmission was available in all models (except the automatic-only 300 turbodiesel).

READ MORE about the 300TD

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1970 Triumph TR6

Ahhhh, what a glorious car to spot in the morning while drinking a spot of tea. This wonderful British Sports Convertible embodies the beauty of styling from all of the world in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Oh yea, and it’s parked behind an E46 BMW M3 Convertible. What a lovely morning!

From Wikipedia:

The Triumph TR6 (1968–76) is a British six-cylinder sports car and the best-seller of the TR range built by Triumph when production ended in July 1976.

All TR6 sports cars featured inline six-cylinder engines. For the US market the engine was carburetted, as had been the US-only TR250 engine. Like the TR5, the TR6 was fuel-injected for other world markets including the United Kingdom, hence the TR6PI (petrol-injection) designation. The Lucas mechanical fuel injection system helped the home-market TR6 produce 150 bhp (110 kW) (145 hp DIN) at model introduction. Later, the non-US TR6 variant was detuned to 125 bhp (93 kW), while the US variant continued to be carburetted with a mere 104 hp (78 kW).

READ MORE about the TR6

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1967 Ford Fairlane 500

Spotted this wonderfully old and preserved 1967 Ford Fairlane 500 on the streets around Silverlake in Los Angeles, CA.  The name for this big bodied coupe was derived from Henry Ford’s estate, Fair Lane, near Dearborn, Michigan. Over time, the name referred to a number of different cars in different classes; the Fairlane was initially a full-sized car, but became a mid-sized car from the 1962 model year. The mid-sized model spawned the Australian-built Fairlane in 1967, although in that market it was considered a large car.

Read more about the Fairlane

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1978 Porsche 911 SC

Apologize for the delayed postings everybody – very busy recently! Today we have a beautiful 1978 Porsche 911 SC Targa.  I have always been a huge fan of the Porsche Targa and Targa tops in general.  This one is bathed in all white and is looking pristine for a nearly 40 year old sports car.

Check out Porsche AG website for interesting information about classic Porsche’s.

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1967 Porsche 912 Coupe

This 1967 Porsche 912 Coupe looks fantastic in white. Parked on the street, I can only assume this one is daily driven.

Some information via Porsche AG:

To bridge the price gap between the 356, which was still being produced at this time and the 911, in 1965 Porsche launched the 912 – a less expensive and significantly less powerful variant of the 911.
In terms of looks and technology, the 912 was virtually identical to the 911. Unlike the 911, however, it was powered by the 1.6-litre flat-four engine from the 356 SC at the rear. Its power output was reduced from 95 to 90 hp at 5,800 rpm for use in the 912 in order to give the engine more low-end torque and stability. Power transmission was provided by a 4-speed manual transmission.

Read More

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1976 Porsche Carrera – Spotted

As we saw yesterday very briefly, this Porsche was spotted outside Mistress the other day. This one is a (I believe) 1976 Porsche Carrera in a beautiful grey color. Check out the pics…

And some information via Wikipedia.

The Carrera 2.7 was mechanically identical to the 1973 RS, inheriting its 210 bhp (154 kW) MFI engine and still weighed the same at 1075 kg (2370 lb). It had the wide RS rear wings and also the ducktail for the 1974 model (except for the German market). It was available either as a coupe or a Targa. For 1976 a special run of 113 coupes with MFI were made. In addition 30 MFI Targas with narrow rear wings were made for the Belgian police.
The US Carrera 2.7 was restricted to the 2.7 K-Jetronic engine as the MFI RS engine was banned on emission grounds. Power output was 175 bhp, later being reduced to 165 bhp, and in California 160 bhp.
The well known problem of pulled cylinder head studs with the K-Jetronic 2.7 engine only occurred in hot climates. This emerged in 1975 in California where thermal reactors, aimed at reducing emissions, were fitted below the cylinder heads thus causing heat build up around the magnesium crankcase and then made worse by the lean running K-Jetronic CIS. The fitting of a 5-blade engine fan instead of the usual 11-blade further compounded the situation. Bearing in mind Porsche’s largest market being the USA, the 930 Turbo, Carrera 3.0 and all subsequent models used aluminium alloy crankcases which were around 15 lb (7 kg) heavier.
The Bosch K-Jetronic CIS varied fuel pressure to the injectors dependent on the mass airflow. While this system was exceedingly reliable, it did not allow the use of as “hot” cams as MFI or carburettors allowed. Therefore, the 911S’s horsepower decreased from 190 to 175 PS (140–128 kW) despite the displacement increase from 2.4 to 2.7 L. However, the engine did have increased drivability.
Also produced for the 1976 “model year”, for the U.S. market, was the 912E, a 4-cylinder version of the 911 like the 912 that had last been produced in 1969. It used the I-series chassis and the 2.0 Volkswagen engine from the Porsche 914. In all, 2099 units were produced. In 1976 the Porsche 924 took this car’s place for the 1977 “model year” and beyond. The power was supplied by a 4-cylinder high-performance fuel injection motor also used in the 411 Volkswagen. Less than 6000 were built.

Read More

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Classic Porsche 912 and 911

To start off Porsche week, we have a 1967 Porsche 912 and a 1975 Porsche 911 that we will showcase more in the next 2 days. As a bonus, I took a pic of two cars that Mistress in Silverlake has in their shop…

I am not particularly knowledgeable with older Porsche’s and my information may not be 100% right.  If any readers have more knowledge and information, please let me know in the comments section.