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1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS

Look at this beauty.  This Camaro SS was parked in a dimly lit underground parking garage and my cell phone could not capture it fully! The Camaro SS was Chevy’s answer to the Mustang GT and man did they nail it.  Even today, the two American automakers duke it out for the title of Americas best “pony car”.  Which would you choose from this era, a Chevy Camaro SS or a Mustang GT?

And check out other Camaros we’ve spotted

1987 Chevrolet Camaro Iroc-Z

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

1978 Chevy Camaro

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1987 Chevrolet Camaro Iroc-Z

Here we have a quintessential American automobile – The 1987 Chevy Camaro IROC-Z.  Does the 1980’s Camaro still conjur up images of Mullets and american flag embroidered jean jackets?  For me, the stereotype has faded but the glory of the IROC-Z lives on.

And…. check out previous Camaro spottings:

1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

1978 Chevy Camaro

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

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1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

LACS fans and blog visitors – it has been too long and I apologize!  The film industry has been keeping me busy non-stop and leaves little time for fun activities like car spotting.  To start us back up after a hiatus, we have a 1974 Chevy Camaro spotted in Silverlake sporting some nice polished Crager rims.

1974 Chevy Camaro (1)1974 Chevy Camaro (2)

Check out some other Camaro’s spotted in Los Angeles:

1978 Chevy Camaro

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327


Some info about the 2nd gen Camaro:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro.
Dubbed “Super Hugger”, the second-generation Camaro was developed without the rush of the first generation and benefited from a greater budget justified by the success of the first generation.[citation needed] Although it was an all-new car, the basic mechanical layout of the new Camaro was familiar, engineered much like its predecessor with a unibody structure utilizing a front subframe, A-arm and coil spring front suspension, and rear leaf springs. The chassis and suspension of the second generation were greatly refined in both performance and comfort; base models offered significant advances in sound-proofing, ride isolation, and road-holding.
Extensive experience Chevrolet engineers had gained racing the first-generation led directly to advances in second-generation Camaro steering, braking, and balance. Although it began its run with a number of high-performance configurations, as the 1970s progressed, the Camaro grew less powerful, succumbing, like many production cars of the era, to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis. Major styling changes were made in 1974 and 1978; 1981 was the final model year for the second-generation Camaro.

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1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

The Chevy Camaro, arguably a result of Ford’s introduction of the Mustang.  Nonetheless an iconic staple in American Muscle Car history.  This ’68 Camaro was a 327 model, a middle of the road trim level for 1968. It looks to have original wheels and body panels. Also, that antenna fascinates me  Just look past the gaudy stickers!

Some information about the First Generation Camaro via Wikipedia:

The first-generation Camaro debuted in September 1966, for the 1967 model year, up to 1969 on a new rear-wheel drive GM F-body platform and was available as a two-door coupé or convertible with 2+2 seating, and a choice of 230 cu in (3.8 L), 250 cu in (4.1 L) inline-6 or 302 cu in (4.9 L), 307 cu in (5.0 L), 327 cu in (5.4 L), 350 cu in (5.7 L), and 396 cu in (6.5 L) V8 powerplants. Concerned with the runaway success of the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet executives realized that their compact sporty car, the Corvair, would not be able to generate the sales volume of the Mustang due to its rear-engine design, as well as declining sales, partly due to the negative publicity from Ralph Nader’s book, Unsafe at Any Speed. Therefore, the Camaro was touted as having the same conventional rear-drive, front-engine configuration as the Mustang and Chevy II Nova. In addition, the Camaro was designed to fit a variety of power plants in the engine bay. The first-generation Camaro lasted until the 1969 model year and eventually inspired the design of the new retro fifth-generation Camaro.
The first-generation offered a standard, Super Sport, and Rally Sport editions. In 1967, the Z/28 model was added featuring stripes on the hood and trunk, styled rally road wheels, and a 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8 engine.

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