Gallery

1976 Chevrolet Corvette (C3)

Take a look at this flat black 1976 Corvette C3 that I spotted.  This vette looks to still have the original rims installed and is sporting a custom chrome side exhaust, that really pops against the subdued flat black paint. Enjoy.

And check out other Corvette’s we’ve spotted:

1975 Chevy Corvette

1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

2012 Chevy Corvette ZR-1

Gallery

1975 Chevy Corvette

Spotted this Chevrolet Corvette from 1975.  A perfect time capsule of engineering, design and bravado from a bygone era. This Corvette is in beautiful shape and I would have taken a nice profile shot had there not been a plethora of cars zipping by.  You see, I value my legs and the ability to walk. But I also value a profile shot of a beautiful 1975 Corvette…. Ahhh what a dilemma! Enjoy these pics.

Gallery

2012 Chevy Corvette ZR-1

Spotted this handsome C6 Corvette ZR-1 in a Metallic Gray just the other day. Posted up somewhere in Culver City, I’m glad to see someone is driving this to the office.

On a side note, have you all heard all the buzz about cryptocurrency, blockchain and Bitcoin? I read an article the other day about how stock prices of seemingly small unheard-of companies are skyrocketing at the mention of implementing “blockchain technology”.

I got to thinking, if I say blockchain and bitcoin enough, will my views skyrocket? If i change my blog name to “blockchain car spotting”, will I see 2,500% viewership gains?  Let’s find out: blockchain blockchain blockchain blockchain.

All kidding aside, look at this ZR-1.

Gallery

1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

Another beautifully orange classic car spotted in Los Angeles (Venice to be specific).  This one is the Third Generation Chevrolet Corvette Stingray (C3).  Our spotted Corvette is in spectacular shape and appears to be rocking the original rims and trunk mounted luggage rack (love this option). Check out this C2 Stingray we’ve feature in the past. Enjoy!

Some information via Wikipedia:

1973 started Corvette’s transformation from muscle to touring sports car. A Chevrolet advertisement headlined: “We gave it radials, a quieter ride, guard beams and a nose job.”
Two 350 cu in (5.7 L) small block engines were available. The base L-48 engine produced 190 hp (142 kW). The L-82 was introduced as the optional high performance small-block engine (replacing the LT-1 engine) and delivered 250 hp (186 kW). The new hydraulic lifter motor featured a forged steel crankshaft, running in a four-bolt main block, with special rods, impact extruded pistons, a higher lift camshaft, mated to special heads with larger valves running at a higher 9:1 compression, and included finned aluminum valve covers to help dissipate heat. The L-82 was designed to come on strong at higher RPM[16] and ordered with nearly 20% of the cars at a cost of $299.[6]
Car and Driver on the L-82 in December 1972, “…when it comes to making a choice, the L82 is the engine we prefer. Duntov and the other Corvette engineers gravitate toward the big blocks because they like the torque. And granted, the 454s will squirt through traffic with just a feather touch on the gas pedal. But, to us at least, the small block engine contributes to a fine sense of balance in the Corvette that is rare in any GT car, so rare that it would be a shame to exchange it for a few lb.-ft. of torque.”
The 454 cu in (7.4 L) LS-4 big-block V8 engine was offered delivering 275 hp (205 kW) and 15% of the cars were ordered so equipped. “454” emblems adorned the hood of big-block equipped Corvettes. All models featured a new cowl induction domed hood, which pulled air in through a rear hood intake into the engine compartment under full throttle, increasing power (but didn’t show up in the horsepower ratings). 0-60 times were reduced by a second while keeping the engine compartment cooler.

Read More

Gallery

1966 Corvette (C2) Stingray Convertible

Sweet 60’s Corvette Stingray Convertible (C2) with the Big Block 427.  This thing was a beast when first introduced and had massive horsepower for the time period.  It still holds its own in many regards.

Some information via Wiki:

For the 1966 Corvette, the big-block V-8 came in two forms: 390 hp (290 kW) on 10.25:1 compression, and 425 bhp via 11:1 compression, larger intake valves, a bigger Holley four-barrel carburetor on an aluminum manifold, mechanical lifters, and four- instead of two-hole main bearing caps. Though it had no more horsepower than the previous high-compression 396, the 427 cu in (7,000 cc), 430 hp (320 kW) V8 packed a lot more torque – 460 lb·ft (620 N·m) vs. 415 lb·ft (563 N·m). Of course, engine outputs were sometimes deliberately understated in the Sixties. Here, 420 and 450 hp (310 and 340 kW) would be closer to the truth. Of course, all power ratings in the sixties were also done in SAE Gross Horsepower, which is measured based on an engine without accessories or air filter or restrictive stock exhaust manifold, invariably giving a significantly higher rating than the engine actually produces when installed in the automobile. SAE Net Horsepower is measured with all accessories, air filters and factory exhaust system in place; this is the standard that all US automobile engines have been rated at since 1972. With big-block V-8s being the order of the day, there was less demand for the 327, so small-block offerings were cut from five to two for 1966, and only the basic 300- and 350-bhp versions were retained. Both required premium fuel on compression ratios well over 10.0:1, and they didn’t have the rocket-like thrust of the 427s, but their performance was impressive all the same. As before, both could be teamed with the Powerglide automatic, the standard three-speed manual, or either four-speed option.
The 1966 model’s frontal appearance was mildly altered with an eggcrate grille insert to replace the previous horizontal bars, and the coupe lost its roof-mounted extractor vents, which had proven inefficient. Corvettes also received an emblem in the corner of the hood for 1966. Head rests were a new option, one of the rarest options was the Red/Red Automatic option with power windows and air conditioning from factory which records show production numbered only 7 convertibles and 33 coupes. This relative lack of change reflected plans to bring out an all-new Corvette for 1967. It certainly did not reflect a fall-off in the car’s popularity, however. In fact, 1966 would prove another record-busting year, with volume rising to 27,720 units, up some 4,200 over 1965s sales.

Read More