Gallery

November ’18 – End of Month Hodgepodge

Here we are again, the end of another month. It can only mean one thing… hodgepodge! Where I select all the random photos of vehicles that didn’t get a post to themselves this month. Enjoy.

Gallery

1970 Plymouth Valiant Sedan

Spotted what I believe to be a 1970 Plymouth Valiant by Manhattan beach on a overcast Sunday.  This one may have spent most of it’s life at the beach, judging by the visible sill rust. None the less a very cool car.

 

Some other Valiant’s/Duster’s we have featured:

1964 Plymouth Valiant

1967 Plymouth Valiant Signet

1963 Dodge Dart Wagon

1973 Dodge Dart Sedan

Gallery

1973 Dodge Dart Sedan

Today we spotted a clandestine 1973 Dodge Dart. Could it be a Green FBI car, Secret Services or the next Men in Black car?

Some information from Wikipedia:

The 1973 model year Darts received new front styling with revised fenders, grille, header panel, and hood. Massive front bumpers were installed to comply with new federal regulations, as well as side-impact guard beams in the doors and new emission control devices. New single-piston disc brakes replaced the more complex 4-piston units offered from 1965 to 1972.
Chrysler’s new electronic ignition system was standard equipment on all engines, and starter motors were revised for faster engine cranking. The K-frame was modified to accommodate a new spool-type engine mount that limited engine roll to 3°. The upper ball joints were upgraded to the larger B-body units. Along with these chassis changes, the wheel bolt pattern on Darts with disc brakes was enlarged from 4 in (101.6 mm) to the 4.5 in (114.3 mm) pattern common to the larger B- and C-body Chrysler-built passenger cars. Darts with 4-wheel drum brakes continued with the smaller bolt pattern. The standard rear axle was still the 7¼” unit, but the heavy-duty option was now an 8¼” item rather than the previous 8¾” rear axle. Standard rear axle ratios were 2.76:1 with automatic transmission and 3.23:1 with manual, though other ratios were available. Vent wings were deleted from the Swinger but not from the 4-door sedans. A new “Quiet Car” package was available, consisting of extra sound insulation, premium exhaust hangers and an exhaust resonator.
The Demon fastback was renamed “Dart Sport” in response to Christian groups’ complaints about the ‘Demon’ name and devil-with-pitchfork logo.[6] The high-performance model thus became Dart Sport 340, and 1973 saw styling changes to go along with the name change. The Dart Sport received the same new front end as the other Darts, and its taillights were changed to two lights per side, each with a chrome trim ring. These would remain unchanged through the 1976 model year.
Gallery

1963 Dodge Dart Wagon

This wonderful wagon was spotted in Los Angeles.  Classic vintage metal with a long-roof is always welcome at LA Car Spotting.

Information about the dart wagon via Wikipedia:

For 1963, Dodge made a last-minute decision to drop the Lancer name in favor of Dart for Dodge’s newly designed “senior compact”, a marketing term referring to the wheelbase having grown to 111 in. from the Lancer’s 106.5 in. This longer wheelbase used the same A-body suspension of the Valiant and defunct Lancer, and would underpin all Darts from 1963 to 1976 except the 1963–1966 station wagons which used the Valiant’s (106 in. wheelbase) and the 1971–1976 Demon/Sport which used the Plymouth Duster’s 108 in. wheelbase. The longer wheelbase gave more rear seat legroom than the previous Lancer or the contemporaneous Valiant. The Dart was available as a 2- or 4-door sedan, a 2-door hardtop coupe, a station wagon, and a convertible. Three trim levels were offered: the low-spec 170, the high-spec 270, and the premium GT, which was available only as a 2-door hardtop or convertible. The 1963 Dart has a turning radius of 38.9 ft.
Gallery

1967 Plymouth Valiant Signet

Back to the vintage American metal, something LA has in abundance. Here we have a very orange 1967 4 door sedan coded the Valiant Signet.  Check out this cool website that gives you quite a thorough history of the Plymouth/Dodge/Chrysler – http://www.valiant.org/

Some information about the Valiant via http://valiant.org/ – written by Lanny Knutson

A mini Mercedes is what Plymouth product planners were calling it, according to Hot Rod‘s writers. The claim reveals something about the engineers’ thoughts as they designed the car. Unlike its sibling, the Dodge Dart, the Valiant had no sporty hardtops or convertibles for ’67; those bodies had been moved to the new Barracuda line. Thus the Valiant was slated to be the corporate “formal” compact while the Dart would carry the sporty image.
There were just two Valiant models, the 100 and the Signet. Through 1966 the latter was either a hardtop or convertible. For ’67 it was “just” a sedan with either two or four doors. However, with the above mentioned trim and optional bucket scats and a possible four-on-the-floor if equipped with a V8, it could relive some of its past glory, most of which went over to the Barracuda line.
There was a Valiant 200 but technically it was a decor option for the 100 offering full-length bright body moldings, a interior mid-range between the 100 and the Signet plus a greater choice of interior and paint colors than available on the 100. For the first time, no wagon version of the Valiant was available. Plymouth, for one year, vainly attempted to replace it with a stripped-down Belvedere wagon.