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1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III (5th gen)

The venerable Lincoln Continental. First introduced in 1939, the Lincoln Continental is a luxury car from Ford intended to adapt European “continental” luxury style and sell to the masses in the USA.  With only a brief hiatus here and there, the Continental nameplate is still going strong today.

Lincoln had a slew of slogans used in their print ads which are just fantastic.  One says “Lincoln makes America’s most distinctive cars”.  That may be true, as the Lincoln continental design language usually stood out as something special, something different. Some other fun ad slogans:

  • “Uncommon luxury for the uncommon man”
  • “Modern living on the move”
  • “The Continental life is never out of date”

Enjoy these pics and don’t forget to check out the other Lincoln continental we spotted:

1962 Lincoln Continental Sedan

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1974 Mercedes-Benz 280C (W114)

Spotted in Silverlake, this ’74 MB 280C is a classic in German styling and engineering from the iconic Mercedes-Benz nameplate.

And some information via Wikipedia:

The Mercedes-Benz W114/W115 was the mid-sized saloon model for Mercedes, positioned below the S-Class. Mercedes also launched its first 5-cylinder diesel engine OM617 in this chassis. It followed heavily in the direction set by the W108/109 S-class, which was launched in 1965 and heralded the new design idiom. The car was designed by French auto designer Paul Bracq who was chief designer at Mercedes-Benz for models from 1957 to 1967, a period that included models such as the Grosser Mercedes-Benz 600. Bracq was also responsible for BMW designs (1970–74) and Peugeot designs (1974–96).
Mercedes introduced a coupé variant of the W114 in 1969, featuring a longer boot hood and available with either a 2.5 or 2.8 litre six-cylinder engine. While a classic and understated design these generally cost less than the W113-based 280 SL model that ran through 1971, and its successor, the 3.5 or 4.5 litre V8 Mercedes SL R107/C107 (1971–1989) roadster and coupé.[4] While a ‘hard-top’ unlike the fully convertible SL, the pillarless design allowed all the windows to be lowered completely for open air motoring. Only 67,048 coupés were manufactured from 1969 to 1976 (vs. 852,008 saloons). Of these 24,669 were 280C and 280CE (top of the range), and 42,379 were the lesser 250C and 250CE (A Mercedes-Benz 220D pickup on the W115 chassis was produced briefly in Argentina in the 1970s).

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1971 Mercedes 280SE Sedan (W108)

We missed a day yesterday – It has been a hectic week! Out utmost apologies to everyone who clamors to their computers to see our daily posts.

Today we can relax in the warmth of this black/brown early 70’s Mercedes 280SE.  Imagine driving around in this beauty – all worries would melt away and you really can’t expect to move very fast.  Take a step back and enjoy a slower pace.

And of course, a little information about the MB 280SE via Wikipedia:

The car’s predecessor, the Mercedes-Benz W111 (produced 1959–1971) helped Daimler develop greater sales and achieve economy of scale production. Whereas in the 1950s, Mercedes-Benz was producing the coachwork 300 S and 300 SLs and all but hand-built 300 Adenauers alongside conveyor assembled Pontons (190, 190SL and 220) etc., the fintail (German: Heckflosse) family united the entire Mercedes-Benz range of vehicles onto one automobile platform, reducing production time and costs. However, the design fashion of the early 1960s changed. For example, the tail fins, originally intended to improve aerodynamic stability, died out within a few years as a fashion accessory. By the time the 2-door coupe and cabriolet W111s were launched, the fins lost their chrome trim and sharp appearance, the arrival of the W113 Pagoda in 1963 saw them further buried into the trunk’s contour, and finally disappeared on the W100 600 in 1964.

Read more about the W108

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Mid 90’s Range Rover County LWB

The SUV seems to have proliferated the American market in the past few years. Now here is a SUV you don’t see too often; a mid 1990’s Land Rover – Range Rover County in the Long Wheel-Base (LWB) form.  This one does not have much off-road utility anymore, considering how low it is!

Some information about the Range Rover County via Wikipedia:

I got nothing for ya.