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Classic Postal Jeep DJ-6

Here we have a retired postal jeep, either a DJ-5 or DJ-6 model from my research.  These DJ chassis Jeeps were produced for United States post office use for over 30 years and were in service far longer than that.  This individual converted their DJ chassis into a civilian, RHD (right hand drive) road-going Jeep cloaked in a desert sand paint job.

Old Postal Jeep DJ-6 (2)Old Postal Jeep DJ-6 (3)Old Postal Jeep DJ-6 (1)

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1989 Ford LTD Crown Victoria LX

Check out this big 4 door Crown Victoria. Gloriously square and proud of it, this Ford LTD is the epitome of police forces nationwide in the grand ol’ USA during the early 1990’s.  Put some bumper bars and some black/white paint on this barge and you’d fool anyone still mentally stuck in the 80’s/90’s.

And don’t forget to check out previous LTD inspired cars we have spotted:

1987 Ford Country Squire station wagon

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1987 Honda Accord Hatchback

Here we have a 1987 Honda Accord hatchback, the last generation for 30 years.  Honda is now releasing a new 2018 Honda Accord Hatchback.  This is a fitting example of a 3 decade hatchback resurrection.  Are hatchbacks making a comeback? Will station wagons be next?

And check out some previous Honda vehicle’s we’ve showcased.

1990 Honda CRX

Some info via Wikipedia:

At its introduction in 1985, it won the Car of the Year Japan Award.
The third generation Accord became the first Honda to employ double wishbones at both the front and rear ends. While more expensive than competitors’ MacPherson strut systems, this setup provided better stability and sharper handling for the vehicle. All had front sway bars and upper models had rear sway bars as well. Brakes were either small all-wheel discs with twin-piston calipers (only available on the Japanese-market 2.0-Si model), larger all-wheel discs with single piston calipers, or a front disc/rear drum system. ABS was available as an option on the 4-wheel disc brake models, though not in North America. Base model Accords rode on 13-inch steel wheels with hubcaps with more expensive models having the option of 14-inch alloy wheels.
The Accord’s available engines varied depending on its market: Japan received the A18A, A20A, B18A, B20A and A20A3; Europe received the A16A1, A20A1, A20A2, A20A3, A20A4, B20A2, and B20A8; Australia received A20A2 and A20A4; other regions received A16A1 and A20A2; while North America received the A20A1 and A20A3. On Accord 1986 model year engine block was marked as BS and BT in USA, BS1 and BT1 in Canada, this cars had chassis code BA. Since 1987 the engine block in Indonesia was marked as NA instead of A20A2. In Japan, the introduction of a 2.0 litre engine obligated Japanese drivers to pay a higher amount of annual road tax compared to the last two previous generations, pushing the Accord into the luxury category in Japan.
The Accord’s trim levels ranged from spartan to luxurious. In the Japanese home market, the Accord was available with a full power package, heated mirrors (optional), a digital instrument cluster (optional), sunroof (optional), cruise control, and climate control (which was also optional). Some North European export models also had heated front seats and head light washers. North American and Australian Accords were not available with most of these options, presumably (and in the U.S. in particular) because Honda was seen as a builder of economy cars, and not to cannibalize sales from the recently introduced Acura line.

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1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1

The 1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1 – second generation.  The Mach 1 nomenclature denotes the special performance version of Mustangs from a time long past. In my opinion, the second generation is not as handsome as the first gen, but this example is in such great condition it is hard to not stare. However, the hood pin was dangling precariously about which did not seem in character with this car. Enjoy some pics!

Check out some other Mustangs we have featured:

1968 Ford Mustang Coupe

Some info via wiki:

The Ford Mustang was successfully introduced in April 1964 as a sporty “pony car” to attract younger buyers into Ford products. After a few years of development, Ford saw the need to create performance Mustangs to compete with GM and their release of the Chevrolet Camaro and Pontiac Firebird.
As the performance war continued, the Mustang’s platform and engine bay were progressively redesigned to accommodate larger engine blocks. Late in the 1968 model year, Ford introduced the 428 cu in (7.0 L) Cobra Jet FE engine in a small group of Mustang GTs and into the 1968 Shelby GT500KR. This was a strong performer and indicated the direction of the 1969 Mustang. However, “GT” wasn’t a name that would initiate images of street screeching performance; hence the introduction of the Mach 1 title.

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1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

Let’s start May off with an excellent example of forgotten times.  This 1970 Pontiac Bonnevile station wagon is the epitome of the early 70’s.  Bask in the beige-ness of this Pontiac Bonneville.

Some info about the Pontiac Bonneville

For 1965, All GM “B” body cars were dramatically restyled. Swooping rooflines, rakish fender lines and the “Coke bottle” profile contributed to making one of the most popular body styles ever produced. The Bonneville got the new styling, with plenty of bright trim on the lower body sides and on the rear deck. Inside, new upholstery and instrumentation were featured. Drivetrains were essentially the same as 1964, except the Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission quadrant, which now featured “reverse” in between “park” and “neutral”, instead of at the bottom of the selections (below “L”), the old arrangement having been sharply criticized as a safety hazard.
A General Motors corporate edict that took effect with the 1967 model year led Pontiac to discontinue the Tri-Power engine options on all of its cars. That year also brought a larger 400 cu in (6.6 L) V8 as the standard engine for Bonnevilles and other full-sized Pontiacs to replace the previous 389, while the 421 cu in (6.9 L) V8 was replaced by a new 428 cu in (7.0 L) engine that offered as much as 390 horsepower (290 kW). Also beginning in 1967, carburetion was changed. The previous standard 600 cfm Carter square bore four-barrel and optional Tri-Power was replaced with the new Quadarajet spread bore carburetor delivering 800 cfm, equivalent to the previous 1966 Tri-Power set-up. For 1969, a 360 hp (270 kW) 428 became the standard Bonneville engine, which in turn was replaced for 1970 by an even larger 455 cu in (7.5 L) V8 rated at 370 hp (280 kW).

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End of Month Hodgepodge – April

Here we are at the end of another month, and as per usual, we have our end of the month hodgepodge collection of photos.  It has been at least a week since I’ve posted and I have seen so many cool cars in passing without having a chance to photograph them! Here is a sampling of some vehicles that didn’t quite make the cut for a full length post but deserve a shout out. Enjoy!!

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1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Sedan

Take a gander at this shining example of styling from the 1950’s from Chevy.  The Bel Air is an iconic vehicle from Chevrolet and perfectly encapsulates the era. This was the second generation of the Chevy Bel Air.

Some information via Wiki:

For 1955, Chevrolet’s full-size model received all new styling and power. The 1955 Bel Air was 3,456 lb (1,568 kg) and 15 ft (4.6 m) long. It was called the “Hot One” in GM’s advertising campaign. Chevrolet’s styling was crisp, clean and incorporated a Ferrari-inspired grille. Bel Airs came with features found on cars in the lower models ranges plus interior carpet, chrome headliner bands on hardtops, chrome spears on front fenders, stainless steel window moldings, and full wheel covers. Models were further distinguished by the Bel Air name script in gold lettering later in the year.
For 1955 Chevrolets gained a V8 engine option and the option of the 2 speed Powerglide automatic, or a standard three speed Synchro-Mesh manual transmission with optional overdrive. The new 265 cu in (4,340 cc) V8 featured a modern, overhead valve high compression, short stroke design that was so good that it remained in production in various displacements for many decades. The base V8 had a two-barrel carburetor and was rated at 162 hp (121 kW), and the “Power Pack” option featured a four-barrel carburetor and other upgrades yielding 180 bhp (130 kW). Later in the year, a “Super Power Pack” option added high-compression and a further 15 bhp (11 kW). “Idiot” lights replaced gauges for the generator and oil pressure.

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1970 Ford Econoline Panel Van

70’s Ford Econoline. Iconic van with classic styling from the 1970’s. Enjoy!

Info via Wiki:

While the unibody construction of the previous generation van was carried over, a major change was made in the overall layout in the body and chassis of the Econoline. To build a heavier-duty chassis, the mid-engine forward-control layout was abandoned in favor of a front-engine layout with the axle placed forward; this also allowed the use of the “Twin I-Beam” front suspension used in the F-Series trucks. The redesign in the configuration resulted in major growth; the Econoline grew 15 inches in wheelbase; an 18-inch longer long-wheelbase model became the largest full-size van offered in North America at the time.
As they had become introduced as options in Dodge and Chevrolet/GMC vans, Ford introduced a V8 engine option into the powertrain line.

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1966 Corvette (C2) Stingray Convertible

Sweet 60’s Corvette Stingray Convertible (C2) with the Big Block 427.  This thing was a beast when first introduced and had massive horsepower for the time period.  It still holds its own in many regards.

Some information via Wiki:

For the 1966 Corvette, the big-block V-8 came in two forms: 390 hp (290 kW) on 10.25:1 compression, and 425 bhp via 11:1 compression, larger intake valves, a bigger Holley four-barrel carburetor on an aluminum manifold, mechanical lifters, and four- instead of two-hole main bearing caps. Though it had no more horsepower than the previous high-compression 396, the 427 cu in (7,000 cc), 430 hp (320 kW) V8 packed a lot more torque – 460 lb·ft (620 N·m) vs. 415 lb·ft (563 N·m). Of course, engine outputs were sometimes deliberately understated in the Sixties. Here, 420 and 450 hp (310 and 340 kW) would be closer to the truth. Of course, all power ratings in the sixties were also done in SAE Gross Horsepower, which is measured based on an engine without accessories or air filter or restrictive stock exhaust manifold, invariably giving a significantly higher rating than the engine actually produces when installed in the automobile. SAE Net Horsepower is measured with all accessories, air filters and factory exhaust system in place; this is the standard that all US automobile engines have been rated at since 1972. With big-block V-8s being the order of the day, there was less demand for the 327, so small-block offerings were cut from five to two for 1966, and only the basic 300- and 350-bhp versions were retained. Both required premium fuel on compression ratios well over 10.0:1, and they didn’t have the rocket-like thrust of the 427s, but their performance was impressive all the same. As before, both could be teamed with the Powerglide automatic, the standard three-speed manual, or either four-speed option.
The 1966 model’s frontal appearance was mildly altered with an eggcrate grille insert to replace the previous horizontal bars, and the coupe lost its roof-mounted extractor vents, which had proven inefficient. Corvettes also received an emblem in the corner of the hood for 1966. Head rests were a new option, one of the rarest options was the Red/Red Automatic option with power windows and air conditioning from factory which records show production numbered only 7 convertibles and 33 coupes. This relative lack of change reflected plans to bring out an all-new Corvette for 1967. It certainly did not reflect a fall-off in the car’s popularity, however. In fact, 1966 would prove another record-busting year, with volume rising to 27,720 units, up some 4,200 over 1965s sales.

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1973 Dodge Dart Sedan

Today we spotted a clandestine 1973 Dodge Dart. Could it be a Green FBI car, Secret Services or the next Men in Black car?

Some information from Wikipedia:

The 1973 model year Darts received new front styling with revised fenders, grille, header panel, and hood. Massive front bumpers were installed to comply with new federal regulations, as well as side-impact guard beams in the doors and new emission control devices. New single-piston disc brakes replaced the more complex 4-piston units offered from 1965 to 1972.
Chrysler’s new electronic ignition system was standard equipment on all engines, and starter motors were revised for faster engine cranking. The K-frame was modified to accommodate a new spool-type engine mount that limited engine roll to 3°. The upper ball joints were upgraded to the larger B-body units. Along with these chassis changes, the wheel bolt pattern on Darts with disc brakes was enlarged from 4 in (101.6 mm) to the 4.5 in (114.3 mm) pattern common to the larger B- and C-body Chrysler-built passenger cars. Darts with 4-wheel drum brakes continued with the smaller bolt pattern. The standard rear axle was still the 7¼” unit, but the heavy-duty option was now an 8¼” item rather than the previous 8¾” rear axle. Standard rear axle ratios were 2.76:1 with automatic transmission and 3.23:1 with manual, though other ratios were available. Vent wings were deleted from the Swinger but not from the 4-door sedans. A new “Quiet Car” package was available, consisting of extra sound insulation, premium exhaust hangers and an exhaust resonator.
The Demon fastback was renamed “Dart Sport” in response to Christian groups’ complaints about the ‘Demon’ name and devil-with-pitchfork logo.[6] The high-performance model thus became Dart Sport 340, and 1973 saw styling changes to go along with the name change. The Dart Sport received the same new front end as the other Darts, and its taillights were changed to two lights per side, each with a chrome trim ring. These would remain unchanged through the 1976 model year.
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1971 Mercedes 280SE Sedan (W108)

We missed a day yesterday – It has been a hectic week! Out utmost apologies to everyone who clamors to their computers to see our daily posts.

Today we can relax in the warmth of this black/brown early 70’s Mercedes 280SE.  Imagine driving around in this beauty – all worries would melt away and you really can’t expect to move very fast.  Take a step back and enjoy a slower pace.

And of course, a little information about the MB 280SE via Wikipedia:

The car’s predecessor, the Mercedes-Benz W111 (produced 1959–1971) helped Daimler develop greater sales and achieve economy of scale production. Whereas in the 1950s, Mercedes-Benz was producing the coachwork 300 S and 300 SLs and all but hand-built 300 Adenauers alongside conveyor assembled Pontons (190, 190SL and 220) etc., the fintail (German: Heckflosse) family united the entire Mercedes-Benz range of vehicles onto one automobile platform, reducing production time and costs. However, the design fashion of the early 1960s changed. For example, the tail fins, originally intended to improve aerodynamic stability, died out within a few years as a fashion accessory. By the time the 2-door coupe and cabriolet W111s were launched, the fins lost their chrome trim and sharp appearance, the arrival of the W113 Pagoda in 1963 saw them further buried into the trunk’s contour, and finally disappeared on the W100 600 in 1964.

Read more about the W108