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2019 Acura NSX

So, you may have noticed that I have been absent from posting for the past few months.  I wish there was some extenuating circumstance that would absolve me from my absence  – yet there is not. I have simply been too LAZY to take pictures and post anything new to this site.  I think my inaction has left an empty space in my creative consciousness – and I am left wanting to create. So fear not loyal LACS followers, the posts will continue and the pictures will continue to flood in.

We will start with this gorgeous 2019 Acura NSX that was spotted at the parking lot of the Malibu Wine Safari. Enjoy!

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A Reflection of 2018

The end of the year has come and gone; it is time to reflect and look back on 2018.  And what a great year it was. We had a lot of fun spotting a variety of cars and trucks around Los Angeles.  We are thankful that Los Angeles provides us with warm weather and sunshine for most of the year, thus preserving beautiful vintage, mid-modern and current vehicles from the grips of rust. The near constant sunshine means that people actually DRIVE these cars year round, a blessing not found in many other cities or states. Los Angeles provides for us sunshine and awesome cars, and I want to pass that on to everyone reading.  That’s what this site is all about; finding cool street cars and sharing them with the world. We especially want to thank you, the reader and viewers of LACS. We do this for you.

The 2019 year should shake out to be a big one for LA car spotting.  We plan to expand the web content to include videos and more editorial content.

Also, don’t forget to write 2019 on all your checks and other docs you sign 😉

Here’s a look back at our favorite spotting’s in 2018:

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1977 Honda CVCC

Here on display is a Honda CVCC from the mid to late 1970’s.  The acronym CVCC stands for “Compound Vortex Controlled Combustion” and was introduced from Honda as a reduced emissions engine. This little Honda is basically a Civic, but received a model name that was the same as the engine name.  I wonder how many other manufacturers have named the car model the same as the engine?

Check out some other Honda’s we’ve spotted:

1979 Honda Accord Hatch

1987 Honda Accord Hatchback

1990 Honda CRX

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End of March – Hodgepodge

It’s that time of the month again… where LACS rounds up the reject photos that didn’t make it to a full-on blog post.  Usually, a LA Car Spotting post will arrive to your divine sleepy eyes in the morning, to brighten up your day, but tonight… it shall appear before you to to liven your night!  Tonight, I write the hodgepodge and sip a cheap imported beer from Germany, a Henninger Lager to be exact. Prost!

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1979 Honda Accord Hatch

Spotted this gorgeous 1979 Honda Accord on a walk around Silverlake today.  I swear I will bring my nice camera next time so we can have some high resolution pictures! I love the styling on this accord, with the quad circle front lights and the intake vent near the top of the hood. Just great.

And check out previous Honda’s we’ve spotted:

1987 Honda Accord Hatchback

1990 Honda CRX

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End of Year Hodgepodge – 2017 Finale

Well that’s a wrap to the 2017 car spotting year. It’s been a fun year and we have spotted tons of cool cars and trucks.

This is the hodgepodge of all hodgepodges.  Thanks for following along and I’ll see you in 2018 for another fantastic year!

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1987 Honda Accord Hatchback

Here we have a 1987 Honda Accord hatchback, the last generation for 30 years.  Honda is now releasing a new 2018 Honda Accord Hatchback.  This is a fitting example of a 3 decade hatchback resurrection.  Are hatchbacks making a comeback? Will station wagons be next?

And check out some previous Honda vehicle’s we’ve showcased.

1990 Honda CRX

Some info via Wikipedia:

At its introduction in 1985, it won the Car of the Year Japan Award.
The third generation Accord became the first Honda to employ double wishbones at both the front and rear ends. While more expensive than competitors’ MacPherson strut systems, this setup provided better stability and sharper handling for the vehicle. All had front sway bars and upper models had rear sway bars as well. Brakes were either small all-wheel discs with twin-piston calipers (only available on the Japanese-market 2.0-Si model), larger all-wheel discs with single piston calipers, or a front disc/rear drum system. ABS was available as an option on the 4-wheel disc brake models, though not in North America. Base model Accords rode on 13-inch steel wheels with hubcaps with more expensive models having the option of 14-inch alloy wheels.
The Accord’s available engines varied depending on its market: Japan received the A18A, A20A, B18A, B20A and A20A3; Europe received the A16A1, A20A1, A20A2, A20A3, A20A4, B20A2, and B20A8; Australia received A20A2 and A20A4; other regions received A16A1 and A20A2; while North America received the A20A1 and A20A3. On Accord 1986 model year engine block was marked as BS and BT in USA, BS1 and BT1 in Canada, this cars had chassis code BA. Since 1987 the engine block in Indonesia was marked as NA instead of A20A2. In Japan, the introduction of a 2.0 litre engine obligated Japanese drivers to pay a higher amount of annual road tax compared to the last two previous generations, pushing the Accord into the luxury category in Japan.
The Accord’s trim levels ranged from spartan to luxurious. In the Japanese home market, the Accord was available with a full power package, heated mirrors (optional), a digital instrument cluster (optional), sunroof (optional), cruise control, and climate control (which was also optional). Some North European export models also had heated front seats and head light washers. North American and Australian Accords were not available with most of these options, presumably (and in the U.S. in particular) because Honda was seen as a builder of economy cars, and not to cannibalize sales from the recently introduced Acura line.

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End of Month Hodgepodge – May

It’s that time of the month again… the 31st – or in some months the 30th or 28th (damn you February). Here is a compilation of vehicles that didn’t make the cut for a full post – yet they still deserve a presence on the interwebs. Enjoy

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1990 Honda CRX

Not everything on this site will be classic American metal! Here we have the 1990 Honda CRX in excellent shape, a rarity with a vehicle once considered mundane and common. A combination of a light weight chassis, slick shifting manual transmission and a high revving motor made the CRX a popular model among tuning enthusiasts.

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Some more information about the early 1990’s CRX via Wikipedia:

The chassis was significantly changed in 1988, from its original torsion bar front and semi-independent rear, to fully independent wishbones in front with a double wishbone semi trailing arm rear, in line with its sister Civic/Ballade models. Outside of North America, this second generation CRX was available with a 1493 cc SOHC or an updated version of the 1590 cc DOHC ZC engine. Many of these were fitted with fuel injection as standard.
In September 1989, Honda also added the 1595 cc B16A VTEC engine to the lineup outside of America. The VTEC engine used variable valve timing to provide increased power in the high rev range, while still allowing low fuel consumption and better idling at low RPMs.
Second-generation CRX buyers in the USA could choose between three different trim levels: The standard (unlabeled, sometimes called the “DX”) with the 16-valve 1493 cc “D15B2” engine and dual-point fuel injection (DPFI), the HF (“high fuel efficiency”) model with the eight-valve 1493 cc “D15B6” engine and multi-point fuel injection (MPFI), or the Si (sport injected) model with the 16-valve 1590 cc “D16A6” engine and MPFI. “DX” models were available with an automatic transmission, all others had five-speed manuals.