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A Reflection of 2018

The end of the year has come and gone; it is time to reflect and look back on 2018.  And what a great year it was. We had a lot of fun spotting a variety of cars and trucks around Los Angeles.  We are thankful that Los Angeles provides us with warm weather and sunshine for most of the year, thus preserving beautiful vintage, mid-modern and current vehicles from the grips of rust. The near constant sunshine means that people actually DRIVE these cars year round, a blessing not found in many other cities or states. Los Angeles provides for us sunshine and awesome cars, and I want to pass that on to everyone reading.  That’s what this site is all about; finding cool street cars and sharing them with the world. We especially want to thank you, the reader and viewers of LACS. We do this for you.

The 2019 year should shake out to be a big one for LA car spotting.  We plan to expand the web content to include videos and more editorial content.

Also, don’t forget to write 2019 on all your checks and other docs you sign 😉

Here’s a look back at our favorite spotting’s in 2018:

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1999 Mercedes Benz SL500 (R129)

Spotted this very clean and well-looked after example of the Mercedes Benz SL500 from the 1990’s.  I have always admired the styling on the SL series and I believe it holds up well in the over 20 years since this chassis was released. And you can’t go wrong with a 5 liter V8 under the hood 🙂

Check out some other Mercedes Benz vehicles we have spotted.

1990 Mercedes Benz 560 SEC AMG

1983 Mercedes-Benz 300TD Wagon (W123)

1992 Mercedes-Benz E500

Some info about this vehicle:

The Mercedes-Benz R129 SL roadsters were produced from 1989 through 2002. The R129 replaced the R107 in 1989 and was in its turn replaced by the R230 SL-Class in 2002 for the 2003 model year.
The R129 was produced as a two-door, two-seat roadster with an automated (electro-hydraulic), collapsible textile roof, with a shell-like, color-matched, tonneau cover. All R129s came standard with an aluminum detachable hardtop that was fitted by folding the canvas roof down and manually attaching the hardtop.

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End of Month Hodgepodge – June 2017

It’s the end of the month and that can only mean one thing –  Los Angeles Car Spotting photo Hodgepodge.  We compile all the automobiles that didn’t get featured this month but still deserve an honorable mention. Enjoy!

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1990 Mercedes Benz 560 SEC AMG

I absolutely love this car – big coupe, black on black, widebody AMG.  It looks like something that an evil villain would drive.  This is a pretty rare car from MB and I’m glad I spotted one around Los Angeles. I’m also happy to say that I’ve seen the owner driving this car around – and as we all know here at LACS – cars are meant to be driven!

Some info I scooped from carscoops.com (go check their site out):

This original 560 SEC 6.0 AMG Wide Body is arguably one of the most desirable high-performance AMGs ever created. Not only because it’s believed that fewer than 50 units were built, but also due to the company’s expertise, which transformed the big Benz into a unique creation.
The car is powered by a bore-out 6.0-Litre V8, designed and built at Affalterbach, which uses an AMG custom quad-cam head with four valves per cylinder, producing twice the torque at half the engine speed of the original 5.6-litre Mercedes-Benz engine. The total outpout is 385 hp and it is transmitted to the rear wheels via a five-speed automatic gearbox.
Moreover, the tuner’s signature continues on the outside that’s oh-so-80s, as the car was fitted with distinctive front and rear fenders and door panels that allowed much wider wheels to be fitted.
This original 560 SEC 6.0 AMG Wide Body is arguably one of the most desirable high-performance AMGs ever created. Not only because it’s believed that fewer than 50 units were built, but also due to the company’s expertise, which transformed the big Benz into a unique creation.
The car is powered by a bore-out 6.0-Litre V8, designed and built at Affalterbach, which uses an AMG custom quad-cam head with four valves per cylinder, producing twice the torque at half the engine speed of the original 5.6-litre Mercedes-Benz engine. The total outpout is 385 hp and it is transmitted to the rear wheels via a five-speed automatic gearbox.
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End of Month Hodgepodge

I take a lot of photos of vehicles I find on the street. Not all of them make the cut for various reasons. At the end of each month, I will post up the pictures of these decrepit rejects. Enjoy!

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1974 Mercedes-Benz 280C (W114)

Spotted in Silverlake, this ’74 MB 280C is a classic in German styling and engineering from the iconic Mercedes-Benz nameplate.

And some information via Wikipedia:

The Mercedes-Benz W114/W115 was the mid-sized saloon model for Mercedes, positioned below the S-Class. Mercedes also launched its first 5-cylinder diesel engine OM617 in this chassis. It followed heavily in the direction set by the W108/109 S-class, which was launched in 1965 and heralded the new design idiom. The car was designed by French auto designer Paul Bracq who was chief designer at Mercedes-Benz for models from 1957 to 1967, a period that included models such as the Grosser Mercedes-Benz 600. Bracq was also responsible for BMW designs (1970–74) and Peugeot designs (1974–96).
Mercedes introduced a coupé variant of the W114 in 1969, featuring a longer boot hood and available with either a 2.5 or 2.8 litre six-cylinder engine. While a classic and understated design these generally cost less than the W113-based 280 SL model that ran through 1971, and its successor, the 3.5 or 4.5 litre V8 Mercedes SL R107/C107 (1971–1989) roadster and coupé.[4] While a ‘hard-top’ unlike the fully convertible SL, the pillarless design allowed all the windows to be lowered completely for open air motoring. Only 67,048 coupés were manufactured from 1969 to 1976 (vs. 852,008 saloons). Of these 24,669 were 280C and 280CE (top of the range), and 42,379 were the lesser 250C and 250CE (A Mercedes-Benz 220D pickup on the W115 chassis was produced briefly in Argentina in the 1970s).

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1971 Mercedes 280SE Sedan (W108)

We missed a day yesterday – It has been a hectic week! Out utmost apologies to everyone who clamors to their computers to see our daily posts.

Today we can relax in the warmth of this black/brown early 70’s Mercedes 280SE.  Imagine driving around in this beauty – all worries would melt away and you really can’t expect to move very fast.  Take a step back and enjoy a slower pace.

And of course, a little information about the MB 280SE via Wikipedia:

The car’s predecessor, the Mercedes-Benz W111 (produced 1959–1971) helped Daimler develop greater sales and achieve economy of scale production. Whereas in the 1950s, Mercedes-Benz was producing the coachwork 300 S and 300 SLs and all but hand-built 300 Adenauers alongside conveyor assembled Pontons (190, 190SL and 220) etc., the fintail (German: Heckflosse) family united the entire Mercedes-Benz range of vehicles onto one automobile platform, reducing production time and costs. However, the design fashion of the early 1960s changed. For example, the tail fins, originally intended to improve aerodynamic stability, died out within a few years as a fashion accessory. By the time the 2-door coupe and cabriolet W111s were launched, the fins lost their chrome trim and sharp appearance, the arrival of the W113 Pagoda in 1963 saw them further buried into the trunk’s contour, and finally disappeared on the W100 600 in 1964.

Read more about the W108