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Happy Independence Day

Hello and happy Independence Day – The day American’s celebrate the pillaging of land from…. I mean, a day American’s celebrate their independence from Great Britain.  We commence celebrations with cookouts, booze, bonding with friends and family, and massive amounts of fireworks. Here at LACS, we will celebrate with a throwback to some of our favorite classic American made cars we’ve spotted.

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The End of (Last) Month Hodgepodge

Work Work Work… That is all I have been doing lately.  Working non-stop does not leave enough time for spotting cars!  Well here is the Hodgepodge that was suppose to go up May 31st.  Better late than never I say.

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1963 Mercury Meteor Custom

Spotted this uncommon variant of the 1963 Mercury Meteor Custom S33 coupe.  At first glance, I thought this was a Mercury Comet.  During the Space Race during this time, it’s interesting that American car companies named their vehicles after celestial bodies.  This particular model is the S33 edition, which was a specially appointed two-door sedan featuring premium exterior trim and interior ameneties including bucket seats, and a center console.

Some info about the Mercury Meteor.  Read More

The Mercury Meteor is an automobile that was produced by Mercury from 1961 to 1963. For 1961, the name was applied to low-end full-sized vehicles; for 1962 and 1963, the name was applied to Mercury’s mid-sized sedans, in a marketing attempt to appeal to the excitement surrounding the Space Race, before being discontinued. Introduced while Mercury as a marque was in flux, and never a solid marketplace performer in consumer sales, the Meteor remains more a side note than a well known Mercury product.
For 1962, Mercury marketing decided that the Monterey nameplate had better consumer recognition than the Meteor moniker as far as full-sized vehicles were concerned (despite the fact that the Meteor outsold the Monterey), and instead assigned the Meteor name to a new line of mid-sized cars based on the Ford Fairlane which, in turn, was based on a long-wheelbase version of the Ford Falcon chassis. This smaller, mid-sized Meteor filled the product gap between the full-sized Monterey and the compact, Ford Falcon-based Mercury Comet.
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1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible

The 1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible is the story of a changing landscape for American  muscle car.  The transition from big power and arguably beautiful styling to emission restricted motors and subdued architecture. This 1971 Cougar bridges the gap between the times and does so wonderfully. Enjoy.

Some info about the Cougar:

For 1971, the Cougar was restyled, weighed less, and had only a one-inch-longer wheelbase than its predecessors (112 vs. 111 – which was similar to GM’s intermediate-sized two-door models, such as the Olds Cutlass). The front end now featured four exposed headlights; the disappearing headlights were eliminated. The center grille piece was now larger, sharing its appearance with the 1971 Mercury Cyclone. The rear featured a semifastback with a “flying buttress” sail-panel. The convertible returned, as did the XR-7 and the GT package. The Eliminator package was dropped, but the Ram Air option remained. The engine lineup was revised for 1971, as well. Now only three engines were offered—the standard 240 hp (179 kW) 351 Windsor two-barrel V8, the 285 hp (213 kW) 351 Cleveland four-barrel V8, and the 370 hp (276 kW) 429 Cobra Jet four-barrel V8.
By 1972, the climate had begun to change as the muscle car era ended. No longer able to use gross power numbers, the manufacturers had to use net power figures, which dropped the once-mighty figures down substantially. Engines were shuffled around a bit with the 429 engine option no longer available. They were now the standard 163 hp (122 kW) 351 Cleveland two-barrel V8, or the 266 hp (198 kW) 351C four-barrel Cobra Jet V8. Other than that, the Cougar remained a carryover from 1971. Only minor trim details were changed in 1972. The big-block engines were gone for 1972 and 1973. The days of performance-oriented muscle cars were coming to an end.

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End of the month Hodgepodge

That’s right, it is the last day of the month and that means it’s Hodgepodge Day.  All the reject and misfit pictures show up for Hodgepodge day. Take a peek…