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March 19′ – End of Month Hodgepodge

It’s the end of the third month of 2019 and that means it’s hodgepodge time.  Pull out your cast iron cauldron and ladle, because we’re throwing you a mix-mash of different cars. Enjoy.

 

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1977 Pontiac Trans Am

You’re cruising down the freeway, T-tops down with the crisp air blowing all around you.  The sun trickles in through the tree canopy as the speedometer needle reaches for another peg.  Your Trans-Am engine rumbles as you cross past a brightly colored billboard.  Your sense heighten, your hair stands on end as your rear-view mirror illuminates blue and red. SHIT!!! It’s the Five-Oh… the Police. You hit the GO pedal with all your might, slamming it to the floor as the transmission downshifts and the V8 roars to life.  You fly down the open country road as the police interceptor becomes a small dot behind you.

Remember the movie “Smokey and the Bandit”? That was a brief intro to get you fired up for the car we spotted today.  While not the iconic Black and Gold Pontiac Trans Am from the movie, the Trans Am we spotted still conjures up images from the movie: 1970’s bravado, chest hair and bell bottom jeans. Now where is the Snowman?!?

Enjoy this spotting, with more to come! And don’t forget to check out other classic Pontiac’s we’ve spotted.

1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

1969 Pontiac GTO

1982 Pontiac Firebird

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

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1976 Chevrolet Corvette (C3)

Take a look at this flat black 1976 Corvette C3 that I spotted.  This vette looks to still have the original rims installed and is sporting a custom chrome side exhaust, that really pops against the subdued flat black paint. Enjoy.

And check out other Corvette’s we’ve spotted:

1975 Chevy Corvette

1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

2012 Chevy Corvette ZR-1

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1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

Spotted this transitional Pontiac Bonneville in Mid-Wilshire.  I call this year the transitional year for the Bonneville since it was the year between the beautiful designs of the 1960’s and 1950’s and the years after.  I do not need to tell you that Bonneville’s from 1971 and onward were not the pinnacle of automotive design. This one is sporting a massive 455 (7.5L) GM motor under the hood that supposedly was rated at 370 HP. That is a lot of horsepower – although this behemoth needed it to move about. Whether those were gross (read – bench test) 1970 numbers is up for debate.

Check out some other Pontiac’s we’ve spotted:

1965 Pontiac Bonneville

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

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1971 Chevy Monte Carlo (1st Gen)

First generation Chevrolet Monte Carlo – the first Monte Carlo we’ve spotted.  Instead of whimsical banter about cars, check out these links for other forms of the name and term “Monte Carlo”.

The Monte Carlo Method

Monte Carlo Alogrithm

Monte Carlo (part of Monaco)

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End of March – Hodgepodge

It’s that time of the month again… where LACS rounds up the reject photos that didn’t make it to a full-on blog post.  Usually, a LA Car Spotting post will arrive to your divine sleepy eyes in the morning, to brighten up your day, but tonight… it shall appear before you to to liven your night!  Tonight, I write the hodgepodge and sip a cheap imported beer from Germany, a Henninger Lager to be exact. Prost!

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1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS

Look at this beauty.  This Camaro SS was parked in a dimly lit underground parking garage and my cell phone could not capture it fully! The Camaro SS was Chevy’s answer to the Mustang GT and man did they nail it.  Even today, the two American automakers duke it out for the title of Americas best “pony car”.  Which would you choose from this era, a Chevy Camaro SS or a Mustang GT?

And check out other Camaros we’ve spotted

1987 Chevrolet Camaro Iroc-Z

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

1978 Chevy Camaro

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1970 Ford Galaxie Station Wagon

A blast from the past – a Ford Galaxie Station wagon from 1970.  Imagine the nuclear family loading up this beast for a trip to the shore or into the mountains to camp.  Yuum, smell the s’mores!

1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (1)1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (2)1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (3)

Check out our previous posts with the Galaxie and/or Ford 500:

1967 Ford Fairlane 500

 

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1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible

The 1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible is the story of a changing landscape for American  muscle car.  The transition from big power and arguably beautiful styling to emission restricted motors and subdued architecture. This 1971 Cougar bridges the gap between the times and does so wonderfully. Enjoy.

Some info about the Cougar:

For 1971, the Cougar was restyled, weighed less, and had only a one-inch-longer wheelbase than its predecessors (112 vs. 111 – which was similar to GM’s intermediate-sized two-door models, such as the Olds Cutlass). The front end now featured four exposed headlights; the disappearing headlights were eliminated. The center grille piece was now larger, sharing its appearance with the 1971 Mercury Cyclone. The rear featured a semifastback with a “flying buttress” sail-panel. The convertible returned, as did the XR-7 and the GT package. The Eliminator package was dropped, but the Ram Air option remained. The engine lineup was revised for 1971, as well. Now only three engines were offered—the standard 240 hp (179 kW) 351 Windsor two-barrel V8, the 285 hp (213 kW) 351 Cleveland four-barrel V8, and the 370 hp (276 kW) 429 Cobra Jet four-barrel V8.
By 1972, the climate had begun to change as the muscle car era ended. No longer able to use gross power numbers, the manufacturers had to use net power figures, which dropped the once-mighty figures down substantially. Engines were shuffled around a bit with the 429 engine option no longer available. They were now the standard 163 hp (122 kW) 351 Cleveland two-barrel V8, or the 266 hp (198 kW) 351C four-barrel Cobra Jet V8. Other than that, the Cougar remained a carryover from 1971. Only minor trim details were changed in 1972. The big-block engines were gone for 1972 and 1973. The days of performance-oriented muscle cars were coming to an end.

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1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Sedan

Take a gander at this shining example of styling from the 1950’s from Chevy.  The Bel Air is an iconic vehicle from Chevrolet and perfectly encapsulates the era. This was the second generation of the Chevy Bel Air.

Some information via Wiki:

For 1955, Chevrolet’s full-size model received all new styling and power. The 1955 Bel Air was 3,456 lb (1,568 kg) and 15 ft (4.6 m) long. It was called the “Hot One” in GM’s advertising campaign. Chevrolet’s styling was crisp, clean and incorporated a Ferrari-inspired grille. Bel Airs came with features found on cars in the lower models ranges plus interior carpet, chrome headliner bands on hardtops, chrome spears on front fenders, stainless steel window moldings, and full wheel covers. Models were further distinguished by the Bel Air name script in gold lettering later in the year.
For 1955 Chevrolets gained a V8 engine option and the option of the 2 speed Powerglide automatic, or a standard three speed Synchro-Mesh manual transmission with optional overdrive. The new 265 cu in (4,340 cc) V8 featured a modern, overhead valve high compression, short stroke design that was so good that it remained in production in various displacements for many decades. The base V8 had a two-barrel carburetor and was rated at 162 hp (121 kW), and the “Power Pack” option featured a four-barrel carburetor and other upgrades yielding 180 bhp (130 kW). Later in the year, a “Super Power Pack” option added high-compression and a further 15 bhp (11 kW). “Idiot” lights replaced gauges for the generator and oil pressure.

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End of Month Hodgepodge

I take a lot of photos of vehicles I find on the street. Not all of them make the cut for various reasons. At the end of each month, I will post up the pictures of these decrepit rejects. Enjoy!