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1976 Chevrolet Corvette (C3)

Take a look at this flat black 1976 Corvette C3 that I spotted.  This vette looks to still have the original rims installed and is sporting a custom chrome side exhaust, that really pops against the subdued flat black paint. Enjoy.

And check out other Corvette’s we’ve spotted:

1975 Chevy Corvette

1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

2012 Chevy Corvette ZR-1

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1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

Spotted this transitional Pontiac Bonneville in Mid-Wilshire.  I call this year the transitional year for the Bonneville since it was the year between the beautiful designs of the 1960’s and 1950’s and the years after.  I do not need to tell you that Bonneville’s from 1971 and onward were not the pinnacle of automotive design. This one is sporting a massive 455 (7.5L) GM motor under the hood that supposedly was rated at 370 HP. That is a lot of horsepower – although this behemoth needed it to move about. Whether those were gross (read – bench test) 1970 numbers is up for debate.

Check out some other Pontiac’s we’ve spotted:

1965 Pontiac Bonneville

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

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1971 Chevy Monte Carlo (1st Gen)

First generation Chevrolet Monte Carlo – the first Monte Carlo we’ve spotted.  Instead of whimsical banter about cars, check out these links for other forms of the name and term “Monte Carlo”.

The Monte Carlo Method

Monte Carlo Alogrithm

Monte Carlo (part of Monaco)

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End of March – Hodgepodge

It’s that time of the month again… where LACS rounds up the reject photos that didn’t make it to a full-on blog post.  Usually, a LA Car Spotting post will arrive to your divine sleepy eyes in the morning, to brighten up your day, but tonight… it shall appear before you to to liven your night!  Tonight, I write the hodgepodge and sip a cheap imported beer from Germany, a Henninger Lager to be exact. Prost!

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1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS

Look at this beauty.  This Camaro SS was parked in a dimly lit underground parking garage and my cell phone could not capture it fully! The Camaro SS was Chevy’s answer to the Mustang GT and man did they nail it.  Even today, the two American automakers duke it out for the title of Americas best “pony car”.  Which would you choose from this era, a Chevy Camaro SS or a Mustang GT?

And check out other Camaros we’ve spotted

1987 Chevrolet Camaro Iroc-Z

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

1978 Chevy Camaro

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1970 Ford Galaxie Station Wagon

A blast from the past – a Ford Galaxie Station wagon from 1970.  Imagine the nuclear family loading up this beast for a trip to the shore or into the mountains to camp.  Yuum, smell the s’mores!

1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (1)1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (2)1970 Ford Galaxie 500 wagon (3)

Check out our previous posts with the Galaxie and/or Ford 500:

1967 Ford Fairlane 500

 

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1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible

The 1971 Mercury Cougar Convertible is the story of a changing landscape for American  muscle car.  The transition from big power and arguably beautiful styling to emission restricted motors and subdued architecture. This 1971 Cougar bridges the gap between the times and does so wonderfully. Enjoy.

Some info about the Cougar:

For 1971, the Cougar was restyled, weighed less, and had only a one-inch-longer wheelbase than its predecessors (112 vs. 111 – which was similar to GM’s intermediate-sized two-door models, such as the Olds Cutlass). The front end now featured four exposed headlights; the disappearing headlights were eliminated. The center grille piece was now larger, sharing its appearance with the 1971 Mercury Cyclone. The rear featured a semifastback with a “flying buttress” sail-panel. The convertible returned, as did the XR-7 and the GT package. The Eliminator package was dropped, but the Ram Air option remained. The engine lineup was revised for 1971, as well. Now only three engines were offered—the standard 240 hp (179 kW) 351 Windsor two-barrel V8, the 285 hp (213 kW) 351 Cleveland four-barrel V8, and the 370 hp (276 kW) 429 Cobra Jet four-barrel V8.
By 1972, the climate had begun to change as the muscle car era ended. No longer able to use gross power numbers, the manufacturers had to use net power figures, which dropped the once-mighty figures down substantially. Engines were shuffled around a bit with the 429 engine option no longer available. They were now the standard 163 hp (122 kW) 351 Cleveland two-barrel V8, or the 266 hp (198 kW) 351C four-barrel Cobra Jet V8. Other than that, the Cougar remained a carryover from 1971. Only minor trim details were changed in 1972. The big-block engines were gone for 1972 and 1973. The days of performance-oriented muscle cars were coming to an end.

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1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Sedan

Take a gander at this shining example of styling from the 1950’s from Chevy.  The Bel Air is an iconic vehicle from Chevrolet and perfectly encapsulates the era. This was the second generation of the Chevy Bel Air.

Some information via Wiki:

For 1955, Chevrolet’s full-size model received all new styling and power. The 1955 Bel Air was 3,456 lb (1,568 kg) and 15 ft (4.6 m) long. It was called the “Hot One” in GM’s advertising campaign. Chevrolet’s styling was crisp, clean and incorporated a Ferrari-inspired grille. Bel Airs came with features found on cars in the lower models ranges plus interior carpet, chrome headliner bands on hardtops, chrome spears on front fenders, stainless steel window moldings, and full wheel covers. Models were further distinguished by the Bel Air name script in gold lettering later in the year.
For 1955 Chevrolets gained a V8 engine option and the option of the 2 speed Powerglide automatic, or a standard three speed Synchro-Mesh manual transmission with optional overdrive. The new 265 cu in (4,340 cc) V8 featured a modern, overhead valve high compression, short stroke design that was so good that it remained in production in various displacements for many decades. The base V8 had a two-barrel carburetor and was rated at 162 hp (121 kW), and the “Power Pack” option featured a four-barrel carburetor and other upgrades yielding 180 bhp (130 kW). Later in the year, a “Super Power Pack” option added high-compression and a further 15 bhp (11 kW). “Idiot” lights replaced gauges for the generator and oil pressure.

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End of Month Hodgepodge

I take a lot of photos of vehicles I find on the street. Not all of them make the cut for various reasons. At the end of each month, I will post up the pictures of these decrepit rejects. Enjoy!

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1966 Corvette (C2) Stingray Convertible

Sweet 60’s Corvette Stingray Convertible (C2) with the Big Block 427.  This thing was a beast when first introduced and had massive horsepower for the time period.  It still holds its own in many regards.

Some information via Wiki:

For the 1966 Corvette, the big-block V-8 came in two forms: 390 hp (290 kW) on 10.25:1 compression, and 425 bhp via 11:1 compression, larger intake valves, a bigger Holley four-barrel carburetor on an aluminum manifold, mechanical lifters, and four- instead of two-hole main bearing caps. Though it had no more horsepower than the previous high-compression 396, the 427 cu in (7,000 cc), 430 hp (320 kW) V8 packed a lot more torque – 460 lb·ft (620 N·m) vs. 415 lb·ft (563 N·m). Of course, engine outputs were sometimes deliberately understated in the Sixties. Here, 420 and 450 hp (310 and 340 kW) would be closer to the truth. Of course, all power ratings in the sixties were also done in SAE Gross Horsepower, which is measured based on an engine without accessories or air filter or restrictive stock exhaust manifold, invariably giving a significantly higher rating than the engine actually produces when installed in the automobile. SAE Net Horsepower is measured with all accessories, air filters and factory exhaust system in place; this is the standard that all US automobile engines have been rated at since 1972. With big-block V-8s being the order of the day, there was less demand for the 327, so small-block offerings were cut from five to two for 1966, and only the basic 300- and 350-bhp versions were retained. Both required premium fuel on compression ratios well over 10.0:1, and they didn’t have the rocket-like thrust of the 427s, but their performance was impressive all the same. As before, both could be teamed with the Powerglide automatic, the standard three-speed manual, or either four-speed option.
The 1966 model’s frontal appearance was mildly altered with an eggcrate grille insert to replace the previous horizontal bars, and the coupe lost its roof-mounted extractor vents, which had proven inefficient. Corvettes also received an emblem in the corner of the hood for 1966. Head rests were a new option, one of the rarest options was the Red/Red Automatic option with power windows and air conditioning from factory which records show production numbered only 7 convertibles and 33 coupes. This relative lack of change reflected plans to bring out an all-new Corvette for 1967. It certainly did not reflect a fall-off in the car’s popularity, however. In fact, 1966 would prove another record-busting year, with volume rising to 27,720 units, up some 4,200 over 1965s sales.

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1969 Ford Ranchero Spotted

Here we have late 60’s Ford Ranchero spotted in Los Feliz.  Last month, we posted an early 60’s Ford Ranchero and the styling sure did change from than to the 1969. Bask in the glory of faded paint and rust color.

Some information about the Ranchero via Wikipedia:

In 1968, the Fairlane line was supplemented by the new Torino, and the Ranchero followed suit, becoming the largest model since the full-sized 1959. Overall, the new Ranchero was not only bigger, but also more angular than before with its more horizontal grille and horizontal headlamps; Ford and other automakers were making a switch back to horizontal quad headlamps. The interior was all new, as well, sharing the Torino/Fairlane’s distinctive four-pod instrument cluster. Though the four round pods gave the illusion of an engine-turned dash, viewed from left to right, they instead featured warning lights for coolant temperature (both cold and hot) and the left turn signal indicator in the left pod with the speedometer in the second pod directly in front of the driver. Warning lights for the charging system and oil pressure, as well as the right turn signal indicator, were located third from the left. In upscale models, this pod was supplanted by a tachometer. An optional clock filled the fourth pod; a decorative “clock delete” panel otherwise filled the space. A seat belt warning light was a new feature, too, lighting briefly in the far left pod whenever the engine was started. The model line also featured wraparound front side marker lamps which doubled as parking lights and rear side reflectors, newly mandated by US law for the 1968 model year.
Three trim levels were offered, beginning with the sparsely trimmed base Ranchero, the Ranchero 500 trimmed like the corresponding Fairlane 500, and the top-of-the line Ranchero GT with its Torino GT trim. Engine choices began with the 250 cubic inch I6 and ran to several V8 choices, including the standard 289 with two-barrel carburetor, and the FE-based 390. The powerful 428 cu in (7.0 L) Cobra Jet, another FE derivative and the largest engine offered in the Ranchero to date, was a mid-1968 option. The 1968 model marked the final year of production of the 289; a 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8 with two-barrel carburetor became the standard V8 in 1969. Two new upmarket engine choices were available, the 351 Windsor with two- and four-barrel carburetion. The FMX automatic was available with both, which was a variant of the old Cruise-o-Matic and was offered exclusively with either 351.