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A Reflection of 2018

The end of the year has come and gone; it is time to reflect and look back on 2018.  And what a great year it was. We had a lot of fun spotting a variety of cars and trucks around Los Angeles.  We are thankful that Los Angeles provides us with warm weather and sunshine for most of the year, thus preserving beautiful vintage, mid-modern and current vehicles from the grips of rust. The near constant sunshine means that people actually DRIVE these cars year round, a blessing not found in many other cities or states. Los Angeles provides for us sunshine and awesome cars, and I want to pass that on to everyone reading.  That’s what this site is all about; finding cool street cars and sharing them with the world. We especially want to thank you, the reader and viewers of LACS. We do this for you.

The 2019 year should shake out to be a big one for LA car spotting.  We plan to expand the web content to include videos and more editorial content.

Also, don’t forget to write 2019 on all your checks and other docs you sign 😉

Here’s a look back at our favorite spotting’s in 2018:

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1967 Chevy Nova SS w/ Blower

Now this is quite the spectacle.  It is not everyday you see a blown Chevy Nova SS with the FREAKIN BLOWER coming out of the hood.  I mean…. come on. I ascertain that these superchargers are large because the boost technology was not as efficient as now-a-days.  The real reason? I will never know for certain – mostly because I’m too lazy to look it up. Enjoy these pics.

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1980 Datsun 280zx

Up for viewing today is a perfect example of a 1980’s Japanese sports car creation.  Now let us all be honest with ourselves; the 80’s were a great time but emission standards and technology advancements were not favorable for the automotive industry.  Cars became bigger and slower; lethargic for a lack of a better word.  Looking back at sports cars from the 1980’s is sort of like looking at a well worn sock on the floor; you lament it’s stinky performance but it still has the intrinsic value of function and style – So you keep it around.

Other Datsuns we’ve spotted:

1976 Toyota Pickup Truck

1984 Nissan 720 Single Cab Pickup Truck

1974 Datsun B210 Coupe

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End of Month Hodgepodge – June 2017

It’s the end of the month and that can only mean one thing –  Los Angeles Car Spotting photo Hodgepodge.  We compile all the automobiles that didn’t get featured this month but still deserve an honorable mention. Enjoy!

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Spotted a 1973 Dodge Charger (Third Gen)

Spotted this hard-to-miss Dodge Charger in Silverlake at Sunset Junction. While it is not the 1970 Dodge Charger made (even more) iconic by the Fast and Furious franchise, this 1973 Charger still demands attention. Looking mostly un-restored, this Charger transports you to a by-gone era of go fast, who-gives-a-shit-about-emissions automotive excellence.

And of course, some info for ya’ll from Wiki:

During the early-1960s, automakers were exploring new ideas in the personal luxury and specialty car segments. Chrysler, fast to enter the specialty car market, selected their Dodge Division to enter the marketplace with a bigger model to fit between the “pony car” Ford Mustang and the “personal luxury” Ford Thunderbird. The intention was to use the mid-size B-body for a sporty car with fastback look while sharing as much of their existing hardware as possible.
For the 1973 model year, Chargers received new sheet metal (though at first glance only the rear roof “C-Pillars” looked different) and were in fact longer, wider, and slightly taller than the 1971-72 cars. Also new were vertically slatted taillights and new grilles. Hidden headlights were dropped, even as an option. The 318 was still standard, with the 340 (available only on the Rallye), 360 (2-barrel only), 400 (low power 2-barrel/single exhaust and high performance 4-barrel/dual exhaust) and 440 remaining as options. The SE models had a new roof treatment that had a “triple opera window” surrounded by a canopy-style vinyl roof. All other models had a new quarter window treatment, discontinuing its AMC Gremlin-style window in favor of a more conventional design. Total sales this year were around 108,000 units, the highest ever for the 1971-74 Charger generation, though more than 60 percent of the cars had the non-high performance engines. The 1973 Chargers, and all Chrysler products, were equipped with 5 mph bumpers, front and rear.

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1990 Mercedes Benz 560 SEC AMG

I absolutely love this car – big coupe, black on black, widebody AMG.  It looks like something that an evil villain would drive.  This is a pretty rare car from MB and I’m glad I spotted one around Los Angeles. I’m also happy to say that I’ve seen the owner driving this car around – and as we all know here at LACS – cars are meant to be driven!

Some info I scooped from carscoops.com (go check their site out):

This original 560 SEC 6.0 AMG Wide Body is arguably one of the most desirable high-performance AMGs ever created. Not only because it’s believed that fewer than 50 units were built, but also due to the company’s expertise, which transformed the big Benz into a unique creation.
The car is powered by a bore-out 6.0-Litre V8, designed and built at Affalterbach, which uses an AMG custom quad-cam head with four valves per cylinder, producing twice the torque at half the engine speed of the original 5.6-litre Mercedes-Benz engine. The total outpout is 385 hp and it is transmitted to the rear wheels via a five-speed automatic gearbox.
Moreover, the tuner’s signature continues on the outside that’s oh-so-80s, as the car was fitted with distinctive front and rear fenders and door panels that allowed much wider wheels to be fitted.
This original 560 SEC 6.0 AMG Wide Body is arguably one of the most desirable high-performance AMGs ever created. Not only because it’s believed that fewer than 50 units were built, but also due to the company’s expertise, which transformed the big Benz into a unique creation.
The car is powered by a bore-out 6.0-Litre V8, designed and built at Affalterbach, which uses an AMG custom quad-cam head with four valves per cylinder, producing twice the torque at half the engine speed of the original 5.6-litre Mercedes-Benz engine. The total outpout is 385 hp and it is transmitted to the rear wheels via a five-speed automatic gearbox.
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1971 Buick Skylark Hardtop Coupe

Good morning and welcome to another LACS post featuring a 1971 Buick Skylark Coupe.  This skylark looks to be mostly factory and originally sported a small block V8 under the hood.  It looks quite monochrome in it’s faded grey. Enjoy pics and check out previous posts featuring Skylarks below.

 

Buick Skylark 1

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1978 Chevy Camaro

We recently featured a 1968 Chevy Camaro that I think is the same owner as this one. This one is almost a decade older and the changes in style show.  I am still a big fan of this generation of Camaro because it reminds me of the styling of the Trans Am from “Smokey and the Bandit” (One of my favorite movies). Enjoy some pictures and information about the ’78 Camaro.

Some information via Wikipedia:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970 Build information for model 123-12487 was released to the assembly plants in February of that same year. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro. A convertible body-type was no longer available.[3] GM engineers have said the second generation is much more of “A Driver’s Car” than its predecessor.
For the 1978 model year, the Camaro featured a new body colored urethane front and rear bumpers. Z28s got a non functioning hood scoop with outlining decal around the intake. Sales topped all previous years with 272,631 units, of which 54,907 were the RPO Z28 “Special Performance Package”.
Available models included the base Sport Coupe, Type LT, Z28, and the return of the Rally Sport. The Rally Sport (not badged RS as in previous years) featured a standard two-tone paint treatment. The Z28 models included a stripe package that was not deletable and featured a 350 cu in (5.7 L) V8 with a four-barrel Quadrajet carburetor that produced 185 hp (138 kW; 188 PS) and 280 lb·ft (380 N·m) of torque coupled to either a 4-speed manual or a TH-350 3-speed automatic.
Another first for 1978 was T-Tops, although they were a regular production option on the 1977 Pontiac Firebird and were introduced on the 1976 Pontiac Trans Am 10th Anniversary Limited Edition.

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Rare 1972 Citroen SM

Now you don’t see one of these everyday!  This one was parked outside of a Fedex Kinkos of all places. Did you know that this car won the 1972 Motor Trend Car of the Year?

More info about the Citroen SM

In 1961, Citroën began work on ‘Project S’ — a sports variant of the revolutionary Citroën DS. As was customary for the firm, many running concept vehicles were developed, increasingly complex and upmarket from the DS. Citroën purchased Maserati in 1968 with the intention of harnessing Maserati’s high-performance engine technology to produce a true Gran Turismo car, combining the sophisticated Citroën suspension with a Maserati V6.
The result was the Citroën SM, first shown at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1970. It went on sale in France in September of that year. Factory produced cars were all left-hand-drive, although RHD conversions were done in the UK and Australia.
Automotive journalists marveled at the resulting ability to travel for hours at 200 km/h (120 mph) in comfort. In 1972 Motorsport (U.K.) noted …”that rare quality of being a nice car to be in at any speed, from stationary to maximum.”  The touring range based on the SM’s fuel economy and the large 90 l (20 imp gal; 24 US gal) fuel tank made long, fast, relaxing journeys possible.
Because the SM had a small 170 PS (130 kW) engine, the acceleration was adequate rather than exemplary – some competitors were quicker. Some owners have fitted the similar sized 220 PS (160 kW) Maserati Merak SS engine, which does improve the driving experience considerably.

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