Gallery

1985 JDM Nascar Toyota Pickup

I don’t know what is going on with this truck but I kind of like it.  It is a mash-up of many different styles, almost as if somebody pulled different modification choices from a hat. It’s a JDM Nascar pickup truck and I dig it’s uniqueness. Bravo to it’s indecisive owner.

And check out some other Toyota Pickups we’ve spotted:

1976 Toyota Pickup Truck

1982 Toyota 4×4 Pickup

Gallery

1982 Chevrolet Silverado C10 Pickup

Hello.  Spotted recently around Los Angeles is this 1982 Chevy C10 pickup with a hard top cap.  This C/K truck still proudly displays it’s 4×4 badge is clearly on the fender. This one caught my eye because it appears to be in great condition – sporting a nice red paint job and even the chrome is still shining bright! Enjoy

Gallery

1972 Chevrolet C10 pickup (CK Chassis)

Spotted another Chevy draped in blue on the same block as the 1969 Chevy Impala the other day.  By the looks of it, this Chevy C10 Pickup has been recently repainted and restored.  Even the chrome was in great shape! Almost look as if it came off the showroom floor.  And it has some of my favorite period wheels; the moonie style wheels! Enjoy

And don’t forget to check out other Chevy Pickups we’ve spotted:

1960 Chevy C-10 Fleetside Pickup

1958 Chevy Apache Pickup Truck

1967 Chevrolet C-10 Pickup Truck

Gallery

1973 Ford F-150 Pickup Truck

Hi there and I hope you all are having a great Sunday.  Today we spotted a well-used 1973 Ford F-150 Pickup truck.  This one has “been around the block” as the saying goes.

And check out some previous Ford F-Series we have spotted:

1964 Ford F-100 Pickup truck

1959 Ford F-100 Custom Cab

1969 Ford F-250 Ranger

Gallery

1960 Chevy C-10 Fleetside Pickup

Spotted another Chevy pickup truck, very similar to the Apache we featured not long ago.  This one has been nicely restored with fresh paint and a healthy dose of lowering.  I have read that these C/K pickups from 1960 were also called “Apache” but I’m unsure. Instead of the term “fleetside”, to indicate a flat bedside, Chevrolet used the term “wide-side” to indicate the same thing to buyers, according to Wikipedia.  I like this and I’ve always been intrigued by classic pickup trucks.  However, I don’t think I could daily drive one.  Would you buy an old truck?

And check out the previous Chevy trucks we’ve spotted:

1958 Chevy Apache Pickup Truck

1973 Chevy C-10 Step side Pickup

Gallery

1964 Ford F-100 Pickup truck

Spotted this ragtag Ford F-Series Pickup truck around Echo Park in Los Angeles. Love these old Ford trucks – inspiring to see people driving these around some 50 + years later.

And check out some other old Ford F-series we have spotted:

1969 Ford F-250 Ranger

1969 Ford F-250 Ranger | Camper Special

1967 Ford F-100 Ranger

1959 Ford F-100 Custom Cab

1964 Ford F-Series Pickup truck F-100 (1)1964 Ford F-Series Pickup truck F-100 (2)

Gallery

1967 Chevrolet C-10 Pickup Truck

Something must be said about the subdued nature of old work trucks.  It is in their utilitarian “blood” to be used, abused and receive snarling glances from passer-bys.  This C-10 Chevy is one of those examples.  Tattered and torn, this truck shows the tell-tale signs of age, use and probably a little neglect.  But as it is parked on the street, I assume that 327 under the hood still puts the ponies to the pavement.

Check out other Chevy C/K pickups we have previously spotted:

1973 Chevy C-10 Step side Pickup

Mid 60’s Chevy Suburban

Gallery

1976 Toyota Pickup Truck

We’re sticking with the theme of Toyota pickups.  This one comes to us in a blazing orange glory from 1976.  Is it coincidental that all the small pickups of this time such as the Datsun 620 and the Ford Courier, were similar looking and offered this amazing orange paint option?  In matter of fact, all the colors they offered on these trucks were pretty rad.  Bring back more cool colors!

 

Gallery

1982 Toyota 4×4 Pickup

Toyota Pickup trucks are a popular breed in Southern California.  As with many of the vehicles roaming LA streets, this Toyota enjoys sunny weather and no snow.  And unless you are close to the beach, that means no salt and no rust. This one is a clean example of Toyota’s iteration of the 4×4 pickup from the early 1980’s. It appears to be repainted and I wouldn’t doubt this has been restored very recently. I can’t really pinpoint this color –  any opinions?

Also check out previous Toyota 4×4 vehicles we have spotted:

1984 Toyota 4Runner (N60)

1988 Toyota Land Cruiser

Gallery

1969 Ford F-250 Ranger

Another classic Ford Ranger seen in Highland Park – Los Angeles.  This Ranger is sporting a two-tone paint job that has been relentlessly beaten by the Southern California sun.  No man or woman shall ride off into the sunset without a Ranger by their side.

Check out some other Ford Ranger’s we have featured:

1967 Ford F-100 Ranger

1969 Ford F-250 Ranger | Camper Special

1969 Ford F-250 Ranger (4)1969 Ford F-250 Ranger (5)1969 Ford F-250 Ranger (6)1969 Ford F-250 Ranger (7)

Gallery

1965 Chevrolet El Camino

This cherry mid 1960’s Chevy El Camino was just hanging out near Venice beach, most likely hauling around some surf boards. It catches a 10 from LA Car Spotting for it’s nicely restored condition. Enjoy some pics.

Some info via Wikipedia (Go to site – READ MORE):

Chevrolet reintroduced an all new, mid-size El Camino four years later based on the Chevrolet Chevelle. The 1964 model was similar to the Chevelle two-door wagon forward of the B-pillars and carried both “Chevelle” and “El Camino” badges, but Chevrolet marketed the vehicle as a utility model and Chevelle’s most powerful engines were not available. Initial engine offerings included six-cylinder engines of 194 and 230 cubic inches with horsepower ratings of 120 and 155, respectively. The standard V8 was a 283 cubic-inch Chevrolet small block with two-barrel carburetor and 195 horsepower (145 kW) with optional engines including a 220-horsepower 283 with four-barrel carburetor and dual exhausts. Added to the El Camino’s option list during the course of the 1964 model year were two versions of the 327 cubic-inch small block V8 rated at 250 and 300 horsepower (220 kW) — the latter featuring a higher compression ratio of 10.5:1, larger four-barrel carburetor and dual exhausts.[9]El Caminos also featured Air shocks in the rear,as well as fully boxed frames. The shocks were continued over all generations, the frames only thru 1967.
The 1965 El Camino received the same facelift as the ’65 Chevelle, with a more pronounced V-shaped front end, and a higher performance L79 version of the 327 engine rated at 350 hp (261 kW) that was also available in Chevelles. Most of the other engines were carried over from 1964, including the 194 and 230 cubic-inch Turbo Thrift sixes, the 195-horsepower 283 cubic-inch Turbo-Fire V8 and 327 cubic-inch Turbo-Fire V8s of 250 and 300 horsepower (220 kW).