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1977 Pontiac Trans Am

You’re cruising down the freeway, T-tops down with the crisp air blowing all around you.  The sun trickles in through the tree canopy as the speedometer needle reaches for another peg.  Your Trans-Am engine rumbles as you cross past a brightly colored billboard.  Your sense heighten, your hair stands on end as your rear-view mirror illuminates blue and red. SHIT!!! It’s the Five-Oh… the Police. You hit the GO pedal with all your might, slamming it to the floor as the transmission downshifts and the V8 roars to life.  You fly down the open country road as the police interceptor becomes a small dot behind you.

Remember the movie “Smokey and the Bandit”? That was a brief intro to get you fired up for the car we spotted today.  While not the iconic Black and Gold Pontiac Trans Am from the movie, the Trans Am we spotted still conjures up images from the movie: 1970’s bravado, chest hair and bell bottom jeans. Now where is the Snowman?!?

Enjoy this spotting, with more to come! And don’t forget to check out other classic Pontiac’s we’ve spotted.

1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

1969 Pontiac GTO

1982 Pontiac Firebird

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

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1970 Pontiac Bonneville 455

Spotted this transitional Pontiac Bonneville in Mid-Wilshire.  I call this year the transitional year for the Bonneville since it was the year between the beautiful designs of the 1960’s and 1950’s and the years after.  I do not need to tell you that Bonneville’s from 1971 and onward were not the pinnacle of automotive design. This one is sporting a massive 455 (7.5L) GM motor under the hood that supposedly was rated at 370 HP. That is a lot of horsepower – although this behemoth needed it to move about. Whether those were gross (read – bench test) 1970 numbers is up for debate.

Check out some other Pontiac’s we’ve spotted:

1965 Pontiac Bonneville

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

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1969 Pontiac GTO

Spotted a 1969 Pontiac GTO that is definitely in “project car phase”.  Looks like the paint has gone through some sanding and ready for paint soon. A classic Pontiac GTO, even in its current form, is a delight to see. Keep on keeping on, yet-to-be-painted Pontiac GTO owner.

Some other Pontiac’s we’ve spotted:

1965 Pontiac Bonneville

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1969 Pontaic GTO (1)1969 Pontaic GTO (2)1969 Pontaic GTO (3)

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1965 Pontiac Bonneville

With more than 50 years under it’s belt, this full sized Pontiac could use some love.  I am sure this is a handful to drive around in Los Angeles, considering it’s rather large stature.  Just look at the overhand behind the rear wheels! How many bodies do you think you could fit in the trunk?

And check out some other classic Pontiacs we’ve spotted

1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

1982 Pontiac Firebird

1965 Pontiac Bonneville (2)1965 Pontiac Bonneville (3)1965 Pontiac Bonneville (1)

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1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe

It took me forever to figure out what this car was.  I knew it was a Pontiac, but I kept looking for Pontiac’s made in the 1960’s. I was looking in the wrong decade!

So here it is, a 1973 Pontiac Catalina and oh boy is this one beat up, rusty and generally run down.  But still, it lives on the street and probably drives. I am confident that with the alternating street cleaning schedule in Los Angeles, that it at least starts and moves to the other side of the street. Enjoy.

1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe (classic vintage car) (1)1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe (classic vintage car) (2)1973 Pontiac Catalina Coupe (classic vintage car) (3)

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1978 Chevy Camaro

We recently featured a 1968 Chevy Camaro that I think is the same owner as this one. This one is almost a decade older and the changes in style show.  I am still a big fan of this generation of Camaro because it reminds me of the styling of the Trans Am from “Smokey and the Bandit” (One of my favorite movies). Enjoy some pictures and information about the ’78 Camaro.

Some information via Wikipedia:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970 Build information for model 123-12487 was released to the assembly plants in February of that same year. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro. A convertible body-type was no longer available.[3] GM engineers have said the second generation is much more of “A Driver’s Car” than its predecessor.
For the 1978 model year, the Camaro featured a new body colored urethane front and rear bumpers. Z28s got a non functioning hood scoop with outlining decal around the intake. Sales topped all previous years with 272,631 units, of which 54,907 were the RPO Z28 “Special Performance Package”.
Available models included the base Sport Coupe, Type LT, Z28, and the return of the Rally Sport. The Rally Sport (not badged RS as in previous years) featured a standard two-tone paint treatment. The Z28 models included a stripe package that was not deletable and featured a 350 cu in (5.7 L) V8 with a four-barrel Quadrajet carburetor that produced 185 hp (138 kW; 188 PS) and 280 lb·ft (380 N·m) of torque coupled to either a 4-speed manual or a TH-350 3-speed automatic.
Another first for 1978 was T-Tops, although they were a regular production option on the 1977 Pontiac Firebird and were introduced on the 1976 Pontiac Trans Am 10th Anniversary Limited Edition.

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1982 Pontiac Firebird

Think knight rider.  Think Smokey and the bandit. What comes to mind? — The Pontiac Trans Am — A vehicle as famous as the actors in both those films. Here’s one in Glendale, California!

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1970 Pontiac Bonneville Station Wagon

Let’s start May off with an excellent example of forgotten times.  This 1970 Pontiac Bonnevile station wagon is the epitome of the early 70’s.  Bask in the beige-ness of this Pontiac Bonneville.

Some info about the Pontiac Bonneville

For 1965, All GM “B” body cars were dramatically restyled. Swooping rooflines, rakish fender lines and the “Coke bottle” profile contributed to making one of the most popular body styles ever produced. The Bonneville got the new styling, with plenty of bright trim on the lower body sides and on the rear deck. Inside, new upholstery and instrumentation were featured. Drivetrains were essentially the same as 1964, except the Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission quadrant, which now featured “reverse” in between “park” and “neutral”, instead of at the bottom of the selections (below “L”), the old arrangement having been sharply criticized as a safety hazard.
A General Motors corporate edict that took effect with the 1967 model year led Pontiac to discontinue the Tri-Power engine options on all of its cars. That year also brought a larger 400 cu in (6.6 L) V8 as the standard engine for Bonnevilles and other full-sized Pontiacs to replace the previous 389, while the 421 cu in (6.9 L) V8 was replaced by a new 428 cu in (7.0 L) engine that offered as much as 390 horsepower (290 kW). Also beginning in 1967, carburetion was changed. The previous standard 600 cfm Carter square bore four-barrel and optional Tri-Power was replaced with the new Quadarajet spread bore carburetor delivering 800 cfm, equivalent to the previous 1966 Tri-Power set-up. For 1969, a 360 hp (270 kW) 428 became the standard Bonneville engine, which in turn was replaced for 1970 by an even larger 455 cu in (7.5 L) V8 rated at 370 hp (280 kW).

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End of the month Hodgepodge

That’s right, it is the last day of the month and that means it’s Hodgepodge Day.  All the reject and misfit pictures show up for Hodgepodge day. Take a peek…