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Happy Independence Day

Hello and happy Independence Day – The day American’s celebrate the pillaging of land from…. I mean, a day American’s celebrate their independence from Great Britain.  We commence celebrations with cookouts, booze, bonding with friends and family, and massive amounts of fireworks. Here at LACS, we will celebrate with a throwback to some of our favorite classic American made cars we’ve spotted.

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End of Month Hodgepodge – 2 part

How could I have missed the end of month hodgepodge not once but twice!  I hope everyone had a splendid labor day weekend. Well alas, here is the hodgepodge pictures of vehicles that didn’t quite get featured.

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1963 Ford Ranchero

Hi there and welcome back from a short hiatus in Los Angeles Car Spotting. Here we have the white knight, or what I am calling the white knight for today’s post anyway; a 1963 Ford Ranchero drapped in white.  We featured other Ranchero’s on our site that you can link to beneath the photos.

Ranchero 1

Ranchero 2

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1969 Ford Ranchero Spotted

Here we have late 60’s Ford Ranchero spotted in Los Feliz.  Last month, we posted an early 60’s Ford Ranchero and the styling sure did change from than to the 1969. Bask in the glory of faded paint and rust color.

Some information about the Ranchero via Wikipedia:

In 1968, the Fairlane line was supplemented by the new Torino, and the Ranchero followed suit, becoming the largest model since the full-sized 1959. Overall, the new Ranchero was not only bigger, but also more angular than before with its more horizontal grille and horizontal headlamps; Ford and other automakers were making a switch back to horizontal quad headlamps. The interior was all new, as well, sharing the Torino/Fairlane’s distinctive four-pod instrument cluster. Though the four round pods gave the illusion of an engine-turned dash, viewed from left to right, they instead featured warning lights for coolant temperature (both cold and hot) and the left turn signal indicator in the left pod with the speedometer in the second pod directly in front of the driver. Warning lights for the charging system and oil pressure, as well as the right turn signal indicator, were located third from the left. In upscale models, this pod was supplanted by a tachometer. An optional clock filled the fourth pod; a decorative “clock delete” panel otherwise filled the space. A seat belt warning light was a new feature, too, lighting briefly in the far left pod whenever the engine was started. The model line also featured wraparound front side marker lamps which doubled as parking lights and rear side reflectors, newly mandated by US law for the 1968 model year.
Three trim levels were offered, beginning with the sparsely trimmed base Ranchero, the Ranchero 500 trimmed like the corresponding Fairlane 500, and the top-of-the line Ranchero GT with its Torino GT trim. Engine choices began with the 250 cubic inch I6 and ran to several V8 choices, including the standard 289 with two-barrel carburetor, and the FE-based 390. The powerful 428 cu in (7.0 L) Cobra Jet, another FE derivative and the largest engine offered in the Ranchero to date, was a mid-1968 option. The 1968 model marked the final year of production of the 289; a 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8 with two-barrel carburetor became the standard V8 in 1969. Two new upmarket engine choices were available, the 351 Windsor with two- and four-barrel carburetion. The FMX automatic was available with both, which was a variant of the old Cruise-o-Matic and was offered exclusively with either 351.
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Early 60’s Ford Ranchero

Bask in the light of a tepid Falcon Ranchero (maybe 1963), a half-car and half-truck creation by Ford.  A sport utility truck of sorts.


More information about the early 60’s Ford Ranchero, via Wikipedia:

In 1960, the Ranchero became much smaller, based on Ford’s compact Falcon, specifically the two-door sedan delivery variant. The popularity of small, economical cars like the Volkswagen Beetle perpetuated a shift in thinking among the three largest American manufacturers; 1959 had the introduction of the 1960 Falcon along with the 1960 Chevrolet Corvair and Plymouth Valiant. A pickup version of the Volkswagen Bus and a van based on the Chevrolet Corvair were offered, as well. The economic recession of the late 1950s also certainly played a role. Ford believed the market wanted a more practical vehicle, one much smaller, lighter, and cheaper than a full-sized pickup truck, and indeed the Ranchero sold well in this incarnation. Now marketed in print as the “Falcon Ranchero”, the new vehicle’s standard powerplant was an economical 144 cu in (2.4 L) straight-6. In 1961, the 170 cu in (2.8 L) straight-6 was offered, and in 1963, the optional 260 cu in (4.3 L) V8 was offered in addition to the 144 and 170. The two-speed Ford-O-Matic automatic transmission (offered between 1960 and 1963) or three-speed C4 Cruise-O-Matic could be ordered as could a three-speed manual transmission. The Ranchero had an 800-lb load capacity.[12]
Three almost entirely different coupé utility bodies were available for this generation of Falcon: the Australian Falcon Ute differed in having a shorter rear overhang than North American models, a cargo box that extended farther forward than the rear window, and shorter doors, while the Argentinian version also shared the sedan’s overall length and short “four-door” doors, adding higher and more squared-off cargo box sides.
The Ranchero evolved along with the Falcon in 1964, becoming just a little larger along with its parent and using the same basic body style for 1964 and 1965. In 1965, the 289 cu in (4.7 L) V8 replaced the discontinued 260 and an alternator replaced the generator in all Ford cars.