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1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

LACS fans and blog visitors – it has been too long and I apologize!  The film industry has been keeping me busy non-stop and leaves little time for fun activities like car spotting.  To start us back up after a hiatus, we have a 1974 Chevy Camaro spotted in Silverlake sporting some nice polished Crager rims.

1974 Chevy Camaro (1)1974 Chevy Camaro (2)

Check out some other Camaro’s spotted in Los Angeles:

1978 Chevy Camaro

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327


Some info about the 2nd gen Camaro:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro.
Dubbed “Super Hugger”, the second-generation Camaro was developed without the rush of the first generation and benefited from a greater budget justified by the success of the first generation.[citation needed] Although it was an all-new car, the basic mechanical layout of the new Camaro was familiar, engineered much like its predecessor with a unibody structure utilizing a front subframe, A-arm and coil spring front suspension, and rear leaf springs. The chassis and suspension of the second generation were greatly refined in both performance and comfort; base models offered significant advances in sound-proofing, ride isolation, and road-holding.
Extensive experience Chevrolet engineers had gained racing the first-generation led directly to advances in second-generation Camaro steering, braking, and balance. Although it began its run with a number of high-performance configurations, as the 1970s progressed, the Camaro grew less powerful, succumbing, like many production cars of the era, to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis. Major styling changes were made in 1974 and 1978; 1981 was the final model year for the second-generation Camaro.

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1971 Buick Skylark Hardtop Coupe

Good morning and welcome to another LACS post featuring a 1971 Buick Skylark Coupe.  This skylark looks to be mostly factory and originally sported a small block V8 under the hood.  It looks quite monochrome in it’s faded grey. Enjoy pics and check out previous posts featuring Skylarks below.

 

Buick Skylark 1

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1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

Another beautifully orange classic car spotted in Los Angeles (Venice to be specific).  This one is the Third Generation Chevrolet Corvette Stingray (C3).  Our spotted Corvette is in spectacular shape and appears to be rocking the original rims and trunk mounted luggage rack (love this option). Check out this C2 Stingray we’ve feature in the past. Enjoy!

Some information via Wikipedia:

1973 started Corvette’s transformation from muscle to touring sports car. A Chevrolet advertisement headlined: “We gave it radials, a quieter ride, guard beams and a nose job.”
Two 350 cu in (5.7 L) small block engines were available. The base L-48 engine produced 190 hp (142 kW). The L-82 was introduced as the optional high performance small-block engine (replacing the LT-1 engine) and delivered 250 hp (186 kW). The new hydraulic lifter motor featured a forged steel crankshaft, running in a four-bolt main block, with special rods, impact extruded pistons, a higher lift camshaft, mated to special heads with larger valves running at a higher 9:1 compression, and included finned aluminum valve covers to help dissipate heat. The L-82 was designed to come on strong at higher RPM[16] and ordered with nearly 20% of the cars at a cost of $299.[6]
Car and Driver on the L-82 in December 1972, “…when it comes to making a choice, the L82 is the engine we prefer. Duntov and the other Corvette engineers gravitate toward the big blocks because they like the torque. And granted, the 454s will squirt through traffic with just a feather touch on the gas pedal. But, to us at least, the small block engine contributes to a fine sense of balance in the Corvette that is rare in any GT car, so rare that it would be a shame to exchange it for a few lb.-ft. of torque.”
The 454 cu in (7.4 L) LS-4 big-block V8 engine was offered delivering 275 hp (205 kW) and 15% of the cars were ordered so equipped. “454” emblems adorned the hood of big-block equipped Corvettes. All models featured a new cowl induction domed hood, which pulled air in through a rear hood intake into the engine compartment under full throttle, increasing power (but didn’t show up in the horsepower ratings). 0-60 times were reduced by a second while keeping the engine compartment cooler.

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1978 Chevy Camaro

We recently featured a 1968 Chevy Camaro that I think is the same owner as this one. This one is almost a decade older and the changes in style show.  I am still a big fan of this generation of Camaro because it reminds me of the styling of the Trans Am from “Smokey and the Bandit” (One of my favorite movies). Enjoy some pictures and information about the ’78 Camaro.

Some information via Wikipedia:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970 Build information for model 123-12487 was released to the assembly plants in February of that same year. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro. A convertible body-type was no longer available.[3] GM engineers have said the second generation is much more of “A Driver’s Car” than its predecessor.
For the 1978 model year, the Camaro featured a new body colored urethane front and rear bumpers. Z28s got a non functioning hood scoop with outlining decal around the intake. Sales topped all previous years with 272,631 units, of which 54,907 were the RPO Z28 “Special Performance Package”.
Available models included the base Sport Coupe, Type LT, Z28, and the return of the Rally Sport. The Rally Sport (not badged RS as in previous years) featured a standard two-tone paint treatment. The Z28 models included a stripe package that was not deletable and featured a 350 cu in (5.7 L) V8 with a four-barrel Quadrajet carburetor that produced 185 hp (138 kW; 188 PS) and 280 lb·ft (380 N·m) of torque coupled to either a 4-speed manual or a TH-350 3-speed automatic.
Another first for 1978 was T-Tops, although they were a regular production option on the 1977 Pontiac Firebird and were introduced on the 1976 Pontiac Trans Am 10th Anniversary Limited Edition.

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