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1972 Chevy Monte Carlo

Hello everyone and apologies for the hiatus.  Spotted this flat black 1972 Chevy Monte Carlo just yesterday around Hollywood.  I think the Monte Carlo is an underrated American classic that has great styling and poise. This one benefits from upgraded rims and tires, sporting appropriate white sidewall lettering. Enjoy

And check out some previous Chevy’s from this era:

1971 Chevy Monte Carlo (1st Gen)

1965 Chevy Chevelle SS (Malibu)

1973 Chevy Corvette Stingray (C3)

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1969 Chevy Impala Hardtop Coupe

Spotted this beautiful 1969 Chevrolet Impala Coupe in Venice, CA not long ago.  It is sporting a 327 badge and draped in a deep blue. Apart from the missing trim piece along the waistline and the sizable dent above the rear wheel, this Impala looks to be in great shape aesthetically.  I can only hope that the 327 V8 is equally as healthy to propel this beast down the road. Enjoy

And check out some other classic Chevy coupes:

1965 Chevy Chevelle SS (Malibu)

1973 Chevrolet Nova

1967 Chevy Nova SS w/ Blower

 

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1971 Chevy Nova Sedan

Spotted this vivid off-white Chevy Nova in Silverlake area of Los Angeles on a sun filled walk around the local reservoir.  The sedan’s are not the most sought after Nova’s, but the combination of the color and wheels on this one make it especially appealing.  It’s a shame this otherwise very clean car has had a “love tap” on the rear bumper.  Let’s say it just adds to the character!

And check out some other Nova’s we’ve spotted:

1967 Chevy Nova SS w/ Blower

1973 Chevrolet Nova

1974 Chevrolet Nova Sedan

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1967 Chevrolet C-10 Pickup Truck

Something must be said about the subdued nature of old work trucks.  It is in their utilitarian “blood” to be used, abused and receive snarling glances from passer-bys.  This C-10 Chevy is one of those examples.  Tattered and torn, this truck shows the tell-tale signs of age, use and probably a little neglect.  But as it is parked on the street, I assume that 327 under the hood still puts the ponies to the pavement.

Check out other Chevy C/K pickups we have previously spotted:

1973 Chevy C-10 Step side Pickup

Mid 60’s Chevy Suburban

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1974 Chevrolet Camaro (2nd Gen)

LACS fans and blog visitors – it has been too long and I apologize!  The film industry has been keeping me busy non-stop and leaves little time for fun activities like car spotting.  To start us back up after a hiatus, we have a 1974 Chevy Camaro spotted in Silverlake sporting some nice polished Crager rims.

1974 Chevy Camaro (1)1974 Chevy Camaro (2)

Check out some other Camaro’s spotted in Los Angeles:

1978 Chevy Camaro

1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327


Some info about the 2nd gen Camaro:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro.
Dubbed “Super Hugger”, the second-generation Camaro was developed without the rush of the first generation and benefited from a greater budget justified by the success of the first generation.[citation needed] Although it was an all-new car, the basic mechanical layout of the new Camaro was familiar, engineered much like its predecessor with a unibody structure utilizing a front subframe, A-arm and coil spring front suspension, and rear leaf springs. The chassis and suspension of the second generation were greatly refined in both performance and comfort; base models offered significant advances in sound-proofing, ride isolation, and road-holding.
Extensive experience Chevrolet engineers had gained racing the first-generation led directly to advances in second-generation Camaro steering, braking, and balance. Although it began its run with a number of high-performance configurations, as the 1970s progressed, the Camaro grew less powerful, succumbing, like many production cars of the era, to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis. Major styling changes were made in 1974 and 1978; 1981 was the final model year for the second-generation Camaro.

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1971 Buick Skylark Hardtop Coupe

Good morning and welcome to another LACS post featuring a 1971 Buick Skylark Coupe.  This skylark looks to be mostly factory and originally sported a small block V8 under the hood.  It looks quite monochrome in it’s faded grey. Enjoy pics and check out previous posts featuring Skylarks below.

 

Buick Skylark 1

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1978 Chevy Camaro

We recently featured a 1968 Chevy Camaro that I think is the same owner as this one. This one is almost a decade older and the changes in style show.  I am still a big fan of this generation of Camaro because it reminds me of the styling of the Trans Am from “Smokey and the Bandit” (One of my favorite movies). Enjoy some pictures and information about the ’78 Camaro.

Some information via Wikipedia:

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970 Build information for model 123-12487 was released to the assembly plants in February of that same year. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro. A convertible body-type was no longer available.[3] GM engineers have said the second generation is much more of “A Driver’s Car” than its predecessor.
For the 1978 model year, the Camaro featured a new body colored urethane front and rear bumpers. Z28s got a non functioning hood scoop with outlining decal around the intake. Sales topped all previous years with 272,631 units, of which 54,907 were the RPO Z28 “Special Performance Package”.
Available models included the base Sport Coupe, Type LT, Z28, and the return of the Rally Sport. The Rally Sport (not badged RS as in previous years) featured a standard two-tone paint treatment. The Z28 models included a stripe package that was not deletable and featured a 350 cu in (5.7 L) V8 with a four-barrel Quadrajet carburetor that produced 185 hp (138 kW; 188 PS) and 280 lb·ft (380 N·m) of torque coupled to either a 4-speed manual or a TH-350 3-speed automatic.
Another first for 1978 was T-Tops, although they were a regular production option on the 1977 Pontiac Firebird and were introduced on the 1976 Pontiac Trans Am 10th Anniversary Limited Edition.

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1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

The Chevy Camaro, arguably a result of Ford’s introduction of the Mustang.  Nonetheless an iconic staple in American Muscle Car history.  This ’68 Camaro was a 327 model, a middle of the road trim level for 1968. It looks to have original wheels and body panels. Also, that antenna fascinates me  Just look past the gaudy stickers!

Some information about the First Generation Camaro via Wikipedia:

The first-generation Camaro debuted in September 1966, for the 1967 model year, up to 1969 on a new rear-wheel drive GM F-body platform and was available as a two-door coupé or convertible with 2+2 seating, and a choice of 230 cu in (3.8 L), 250 cu in (4.1 L) inline-6 or 302 cu in (4.9 L), 307 cu in (5.0 L), 327 cu in (5.4 L), 350 cu in (5.7 L), and 396 cu in (6.5 L) V8 powerplants. Concerned with the runaway success of the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet executives realized that their compact sporty car, the Corvair, would not be able to generate the sales volume of the Mustang due to its rear-engine design, as well as declining sales, partly due to the negative publicity from Ralph Nader’s book, Unsafe at Any Speed. Therefore, the Camaro was touted as having the same conventional rear-drive, front-engine configuration as the Mustang and Chevy II Nova. In addition, the Camaro was designed to fit a variety of power plants in the engine bay. The first-generation Camaro lasted until the 1969 model year and eventually inspired the design of the new retro fifth-generation Camaro.
The first-generation offered a standard, Super Sport, and Rally Sport editions. In 1967, the Z/28 model was added featuring stripes on the hood and trunk, styled rally road wheels, and a 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8 engine.

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1967 Ford Fairlane 500

Spotted this wonderfully old and preserved 1967 Ford Fairlane 500 on the streets around Silverlake in Los Angeles, CA.  The name for this big bodied coupe was derived from Henry Ford’s estate, Fair Lane, near Dearborn, Michigan. Over time, the name referred to a number of different cars in different classes; the Fairlane was initially a full-sized car, but became a mid-sized car from the 1962 model year. The mid-sized model spawned the Australian-built Fairlane in 1967, although in that market it was considered a large car.

Read more about the Fairlane