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January 2018 Hodgepodge

The first end of month hodgepodge of 2018 and it is … well… not much.  I didn’t have a chance to get out and go spotting much this month with work consuming all but 1 week this month. Enjoy

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1968 Chevrolet Camaro 327

The Chevy Camaro, arguably a result of Ford’s introduction of the Mustang.  Nonetheless an iconic staple in American Muscle Car history.  This ’68 Camaro was a 327 model, a middle of the road trim level for 1968. It looks to have original wheels and body panels. Also, that antenna fascinates me  Just look past the gaudy stickers!

Some information about the First Generation Camaro via Wikipedia:

The first-generation Camaro debuted in September 1966, for the 1967 model year, up to 1969 on a new rear-wheel drive GM F-body platform and was available as a two-door coupé or convertible with 2+2 seating, and a choice of 230 cu in (3.8 L), 250 cu in (4.1 L) inline-6 or 302 cu in (4.9 L), 307 cu in (5.0 L), 327 cu in (5.4 L), 350 cu in (5.7 L), and 396 cu in (6.5 L) V8 powerplants. Concerned with the runaway success of the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet executives realized that their compact sporty car, the Corvair, would not be able to generate the sales volume of the Mustang due to its rear-engine design, as well as declining sales, partly due to the negative publicity from Ralph Nader’s book, Unsafe at Any Speed. Therefore, the Camaro was touted as having the same conventional rear-drive, front-engine configuration as the Mustang and Chevy II Nova. In addition, the Camaro was designed to fit a variety of power plants in the engine bay. The first-generation Camaro lasted until the 1969 model year and eventually inspired the design of the new retro fifth-generation Camaro.
The first-generation offered a standard, Super Sport, and Rally Sport editions. In 1967, the Z/28 model was added featuring stripes on the hood and trunk, styled rally road wheels, and a 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8 engine.

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1970 Triumph TR6

Ahhhh, what a glorious car to spot in the morning while drinking a spot of tea. This wonderful British Sports Convertible embodies the beauty of styling from all of the world in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Oh yea, and it’s parked behind an E46 BMW M3 Convertible. What a lovely morning!

From Wikipedia:

The Triumph TR6 (1968–76) is a British six-cylinder sports car and the best-seller of the TR range built by Triumph when production ended in July 1976.

All TR6 sports cars featured inline six-cylinder engines. For the US market the engine was carburetted, as had been the US-only TR250 engine. Like the TR5, the TR6 was fuel-injected for other world markets including the United Kingdom, hence the TR6PI (petrol-injection) designation. The Lucas mechanical fuel injection system helped the home-market TR6 produce 150 bhp (110 kW) (145 hp DIN) at model introduction. Later, the non-US TR6 variant was detuned to 125 bhp (93 kW), while the US variant continued to be carburetted with a mere 104 hp (78 kW).

READ MORE about the TR6

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1968 Porsche 911T

Another classic Porsche from the late 1960’s graces our site this fine Tuesday.  Draped in a beautiful dark blue color, this Porsche 911T exhibits a strong yet subtle presence. Enjoy.

Some information via Porsche AG:

In September 1963, Porsche presented the Porsche 901 at the IAA in Frankfurt as a successor to the Porsche 356. One year later, as of model year 1965, series production of the model began and it was renamed the 911 shortly thereafter.
Originally built only as a Coupé, the 911 had an integral body-frame and was powered by a new 2.0-litre flat-six engine, which initially delivered 130 hp.
The “Touring” version became the new entry-level model in the 911 family, initially developing 110 hp and later 130 hp. Its equipment matched that of the four-cylinder 912 model. One of the ways in which it could be distinguished from more powerful models was the fact that it had a silver rather than a gold logo.

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1967 Porsche 912 Coupe

This 1967 Porsche 912 Coupe looks fantastic in white. Parked on the street, I can only assume this one is daily driven.

Some information via Porsche AG:

To bridge the price gap between the 356, which was still being produced at this time and the 911, in 1965 Porsche launched the 912 – a less expensive and significantly less powerful variant of the 911.
In terms of looks and technology, the 912 was virtually identical to the 911. Unlike the 911, however, it was powered by the 1.6-litre flat-four engine from the 356 SC at the rear. Its power output was reduced from 95 to 90 hp at 5,800 rpm for use in the 912 in order to give the engine more low-end torque and stability. Power transmission was provided by a 4-speed manual transmission.

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1976 Porsche Carrera – Spotted

As we saw yesterday very briefly, this Porsche was spotted outside Mistress the other day. This one is a (I believe) 1976 Porsche Carrera in a beautiful grey color. Check out the pics…

And some information via Wikipedia.

The Carrera 2.7 was mechanically identical to the 1973 RS, inheriting its 210 bhp (154 kW) MFI engine and still weighed the same at 1075 kg (2370 lb). It had the wide RS rear wings and also the ducktail for the 1974 model (except for the German market). It was available either as a coupe or a Targa. For 1976 a special run of 113 coupes with MFI were made. In addition 30 MFI Targas with narrow rear wings were made for the Belgian police.
The US Carrera 2.7 was restricted to the 2.7 K-Jetronic engine as the MFI RS engine was banned on emission grounds. Power output was 175 bhp, later being reduced to 165 bhp, and in California 160 bhp.
The well known problem of pulled cylinder head studs with the K-Jetronic 2.7 engine only occurred in hot climates. This emerged in 1975 in California where thermal reactors, aimed at reducing emissions, were fitted below the cylinder heads thus causing heat build up around the magnesium crankcase and then made worse by the lean running K-Jetronic CIS. The fitting of a 5-blade engine fan instead of the usual 11-blade further compounded the situation. Bearing in mind Porsche’s largest market being the USA, the 930 Turbo, Carrera 3.0 and all subsequent models used aluminium alloy crankcases which were around 15 lb (7 kg) heavier.
The Bosch K-Jetronic CIS varied fuel pressure to the injectors dependent on the mass airflow. While this system was exceedingly reliable, it did not allow the use of as “hot” cams as MFI or carburettors allowed. Therefore, the 911S’s horsepower decreased from 190 to 175 PS (140–128 kW) despite the displacement increase from 2.4 to 2.7 L. However, the engine did have increased drivability.
Also produced for the 1976 “model year”, for the U.S. market, was the 912E, a 4-cylinder version of the 911 like the 912 that had last been produced in 1969. It used the I-series chassis and the 2.0 Volkswagen engine from the Porsche 914. In all, 2099 units were produced. In 1976 the Porsche 924 took this car’s place for the 1977 “model year” and beyond. The power was supplied by a 4-cylinder high-performance fuel injection motor also used in the 411 Volkswagen. Less than 6000 were built.

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Classic Porsche 912 and 911

To start off Porsche week, we have a 1967 Porsche 912 and a 1975 Porsche 911 that we will showcase more in the next 2 days. As a bonus, I took a pic of two cars that Mistress in Silverlake has in their shop…

I am not particularly knowledgeable with older Porsche’s and my information may not be 100% right.  If any readers have more knowledge and information, please let me know in the comments section.

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A Week of Porsche

Let’s kick off a week of nothing but Porsche vehicles with this slew of Porsche 911’s from various generations.  I had to stop by this shop in Silverlake, named Mistress, that exclusively works on Porsche vehicles.  All these were parked on the street and I assume are either the vehicles of employees or customer’s vehicles.

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Spotted – Alfa Romeo 4C

Spotted this magnificently sans-pigment Alfa Romeo 4C.  Often underappreciated, the Alfa Romeo 4C is a true Mid-Engine Sports car.

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As usual, some information via Wiki:

The Alfa Romeo 4C (Type 960) is a small, lightweight, rear wheel drive sports car. Available in coupé and spider bodystyles, it uses a carbon fiber tub, front and rear crash box, and hybrid rear frame mainly out of aluminium to keep its weight at 895 kilograms (1,973 lb) and 1,050 kilograms (2,315 lb) in the United States. The 4C is the first mass-produced Alfa Romeo car to re-enter into the United States market.
Production of 4C began May 2013 at Maserati’s plant in Modena, with an expected production of up to 2500 units per year. It will be the first mass-produced Alfa Romeo car for re-entry into the US market.
Production of Alfa Romeo 4C was originally estimated to be over 1000 units per year,[26] with an upper limit of 3500 units per year, depending on the quantity of carbon fiber chassis that can be built by the supplier Adler Plastic. Within the 3,500-unit quota, 1,000 units of which are earmarked for Europe.

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2012 Lotus Evora spotted in Glendale

Here it is – one pic.  The owner of this fabulous Lotus raced off in a stupendous hurry once he saw the paparazzi eyeing up his white Lotus!

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Some information about the Lotus Evora via Wikipedia:

Evora is the first product of a five-year plan started in 2006 to expand the Lotus line-up beyond its current track-specialized offerings, with the aim of making Evora a somewhat of a more practical road car that would appeal to the mainstream. As such it is a larger car than recent Elise models and its derivatives (Exige, Europa S, etc.), with an unladen weight of 1,383 kg (3,049 lb).
It is currently the only Lotus model with a 2+2 configuration, although it has been announced that it will also be offered in a two-seater configuration, referred to as the “Plus Zero” option. It along with the BMW i8 are the only 2+2 mid-engined coupés on sale. The interior is larger to allow taller persons to fit, such as Lotus CEO Mike Kimberley, and two 6’5″ (195.6 cm) tall people.
The cooled boot behind the engine is large enough to fit a set of golf clubs, although Lotus Design Head Russell Carr denies that this was intentional. Lotus intends Evora to compete with different market sectors including the Porsche Cayman.
The Evora is constructed from a modular lightweight bonded aluminium structure with composite body panels. It features forged aluminium double wishbone suspension with Bilstein high-performance gas dampers and Eibach coaxial coil springs. Steering is by hydraulically assisted power steering. The Evora is equipped with a mid-mounted, transverse, Toyota-sourced 3.5-litre 24-valve V6 engine. The Evora S uses the same engine but with a supercharger.