Gallery

1963 Plymouth Valiant Signet 200

This Plymouth Signet 200 transports us back to an era when… well… when Plymouth was still a car company.   Powered by ways of a measly slant 6, this Signet sloths along the Los Angeles roadways in search of fresh air and endless time. With 2 doors and no worries in the world… is there more you can ask for?

And when you’re finished here, check out previous Plymouth Valiant’s we have spotted:

1970 Plymouth Valiant Sedan

1964 Plymouth Valiant

1967 Plymouth Valiant Signet

Gallery

1967 Plymouth Valiant Signet

Back to the vintage American metal, something LA has in abundance. Here we have a very orange 1967 4 door sedan coded the Valiant Signet.  Check out this cool website that gives you quite a thorough history of the Plymouth/Dodge/Chrysler – http://www.valiant.org/

Some information about the Valiant via http://valiant.org/ – written by Lanny Knutson

A mini Mercedes is what Plymouth product planners were calling it, according to Hot Rod‘s writers. The claim reveals something about the engineers’ thoughts as they designed the car. Unlike its sibling, the Dodge Dart, the Valiant had no sporty hardtops or convertibles for ’67; those bodies had been moved to the new Barracuda line. Thus the Valiant was slated to be the corporate “formal” compact while the Dart would carry the sporty image.
There were just two Valiant models, the 100 and the Signet. Through 1966 the latter was either a hardtop or convertible. For ’67 it was “just” a sedan with either two or four doors. However, with the above mentioned trim and optional bucket scats and a possible four-on-the-floor if equipped with a V8, it could relive some of its past glory, most of which went over to the Barracuda line.
There was a Valiant 200 but technically it was a decor option for the 100 offering full-length bright body moldings, a interior mid-range between the 100 and the Signet plus a greater choice of interior and paint colors than available on the 100. For the first time, no wagon version of the Valiant was available. Plymouth, for one year, vainly attempted to replace it with a stripped-down Belvedere wagon.