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November ’18 – End of Month Hodgepodge

Here we are again, the end of another month. It can only mean one thing… hodgepodge! Where I select all the random photos of vehicles that didn’t get a post to themselves this month. Enjoy.

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End of February Hodgepodge

I missed the end of the month hodgepodge post! In all fairness, I’ve been working many back-to-back 14 hour days and haven’t had the will power to turn on my computer.  With my petty excuses aside, here is the February Hodgepodge. More posts on the way!

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1956 Volkswagen Beetle

Imagine enjoying a relaxing summer night cruising around in this very clean and restored 1956 VW Bettle, warm wind blowing through the open windows and the purr of the small air-cooled boxer engine behind you. This one was spotted in Canoga Park in Los Angeles County.

Some info via Wiki:

During this period, a myriad of changes were made throughout the vehicle beginning with the availability of hydraulic brakes and a folding fabric sunroof in 1950. The rear window of the VW Beetle evolved from a divided or “split” oval, to a singular oval. The change occurred between October 1952 and March 1953. Beetles built during this time were known as a “Zwitter”, or “hybrid”, as they used the split-window bodyshell with oval-model chrome trim, vent windows and dashboard.
1953 models received a redesigned instrument panel. The one-piece “Pope’s Nose” combination license plate/brake light was replaced by a smaller flat-bottomed license plate light. The brake light function was transferred to new heart-shaped lamps located in the top of the taillight housings.
In 1954, Volkswagen added 2 mm to the cylinder bore, increasing the displacement from 1,131 (1100) cc to 1,192 (1200) cc. This coincided with upgrades to various key components including a redesign of the crankshaft. This increased power from 30 hp (22 kW; 30 PS) to 36 hp (27 kW; 36 PS) and improved the engine’s free revving abilities without compromising torque at lower engine speeds.  At the same time, compression ratios were progressively raised as, little by little, the octane ratings of available fuel was raised in major markets during the 1950s and 1960s.
In 1955, the separate brake lights were discontinued and were combined into a new larger taillight housing. The traditional VW semaphore turn signals were replaced by conventional flashing directional indicator lamps for North America.
For 1956, the Beetle received what would become one of its more distinctive features, a set of twin chrome tailpipes. Models for North America gained taller bumper guards and tubular overrider bars.

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1968 VW Beetle

The beloved classic – Dubbed “The People’s Car”.

Some information via Wiki:

For 1967, a yet-again larger-displacement engine was made available: 1500cc, 53 hp (40 kW; 54 PS) at 4,200 rpm. 1200 and 1300 engines continued to be available, as many markets based their taxation on engine size. 1500cc Beetles were equipped with front disc brakes and were identified with a “VW 1500” badge on the engine lid. North America received the 1500 engine as standard equipment, but did not receive front disc brakes. These models were identified by a “Volkswagen” badge on the engine lid.
1968 was a year of major change. The most noticeable of which were the new larger, higher mounted C-section bumpers. At the rear, new larger taillamps were adopted and were able to accommodate backup lamps, which were previously separate bumper-mounted units. Beetles worldwide received the ’67 North American style vertical headlamp placement, but with replaceable-bulb headlamps compliant with ECE regulations rather than the US sealed beams. Other improvements were a new outside gas filler with spring-loaded flap, eliminating the need to open the trunk to refuel.

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