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November ’18 – End of Month Hodgepodge

Here we are again, the end of another month. It can only mean one thing… hodgepodge! Where I select all the random photos of vehicles that didn’t get a post to themselves this month. Enjoy.

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1970 Volkswagen Squareback (Type 3)

I absolutely love the simple naming mechanism for this vehicle and vehicles made by VW in this era.  Type 1, Type 2, etc… – so easy. And this model is just called squareback – so explicable. This one is sporting some healthy dents and dings in the body, as well as an interesting faded tan paint job.

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End of February Hodgepodge

I missed the end of the month hodgepodge post! In all fairness, I’ve been working many back-to-back 14 hour days and haven’t had the will power to turn on my computer.  With my petty excuses aside, here is the February Hodgepodge. More posts on the way!

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1989 Volkswagen Cabriolet

As I took a picture of this car, I was swept away to high school days with a Rabbit Cabriolet leaving on the last day of school, teenagers filled to the brim.  Why does this vehicle seem so quintessential to summer days and young folks?  It is the perfect combination of affordable transportation and top-down summer fun body architecture.

We’ve posted a few different classic Volkswagen vehicles at LACS so make sure to check out our previous posts – just hit that search button!

Here is some brief info about the VW Cabriolet.

The convertible version, named the Golf Cabriolet (or Typ 155) in Europe and Canada (“Rabbit Convertible” in America originally and renamed in 1985 to “Cabriolet”), was sold from 1980 to 1993. It had a reinforced body, transverse roll bar, and a high level of trim, and kept the pre-1980 style of rear lamp clusters. The Mk1 Cabriolet is of unibody construction built entirely at the factory of Karmann, from stamping to final assembly; Volkswagen supplied the engine, suspension, interior, etc. for Karmann to install. The vinyl or cloth tops were heavily insulated and manually – or beginning in 1991, electrically – operated, with a heated glass rear window.
The body of the Cabriolet did not change through the entire production run except for a larger fuel tank. The space saver wheel was fitted from the outset in 1978, when pre production models were built, unlike the saloon which adopted this in 1984. In an attempt by Volkswagen to keep the car’s styling current, all Cabriolets from 1988 on were fitted with a “Clipper” kit out of the factory, featuring smooth body-coloured bumpers, wheelarch extensions, and side skirts.
Prior to the 1984 model year the highest standard specification was the GLI, essentially a GTI but sporting a different moniker. It was only in 1984 that an officially badged GTI version of the cabriolet finally became available.

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1956 Volkswagen Beetle

Imagine enjoying a relaxing summer night cruising around in this very clean and restored 1956 VW Bettle, warm wind blowing through the open windows and the purr of the small air-cooled boxer engine behind you. This one was spotted in Canoga Park in Los Angeles County.

Some info via Wiki:

During this period, a myriad of changes were made throughout the vehicle beginning with the availability of hydraulic brakes and a folding fabric sunroof in 1950. The rear window of the VW Beetle evolved from a divided or “split” oval, to a singular oval. The change occurred between October 1952 and March 1953. Beetles built during this time were known as a “Zwitter”, or “hybrid”, as they used the split-window bodyshell with oval-model chrome trim, vent windows and dashboard.
1953 models received a redesigned instrument panel. The one-piece “Pope’s Nose” combination license plate/brake light was replaced by a smaller flat-bottomed license plate light. The brake light function was transferred to new heart-shaped lamps located in the top of the taillight housings.
In 1954, Volkswagen added 2 mm to the cylinder bore, increasing the displacement from 1,131 (1100) cc to 1,192 (1200) cc. This coincided with upgrades to various key components including a redesign of the crankshaft. This increased power from 30 hp (22 kW; 30 PS) to 36 hp (27 kW; 36 PS) and improved the engine’s free revving abilities without compromising torque at lower engine speeds.  At the same time, compression ratios were progressively raised as, little by little, the octane ratings of available fuel was raised in major markets during the 1950s and 1960s.
In 1955, the separate brake lights were discontinued and were combined into a new larger taillight housing. The traditional VW semaphore turn signals were replaced by conventional flashing directional indicator lamps for North America.
For 1956, the Beetle received what would become one of its more distinctive features, a set of twin chrome tailpipes. Models for North America gained taller bumper guards and tubular overrider bars.

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1968 VW Bus (Vanagon) Type 2

Here we have another VW type 2 Bus in a beautifully stunning orange paint job.  These vehicles are extremely popular among road travelers and vacationers for their roomy and comfortable interiors.  Enjoy.

See our past posts of VW Buses with more information and pictures.

Bus 1

Bus 2

 

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1973 VW Bus Type 2 (T2)

Ahhh, the famous VW bus – known in America as the hippie’s home-base. I love seeing non-restored vintage vehicles. This particular example seemed to receive a softball throw into the front windshield!

Some information via Wiki:

In late 1967, the second generation of the Volkswagen Type 2 (T2) was introduced. It was built in Germany until 1979. In Mexico, the Volkswagen Kombi and Panel were produced from 1970 to 1994. Models before 1971 are often called the T2a (or “Early Bay”), while models after 1972 are called the T2b (or “Late Bay”).
This second-generation Type 2 lost its distinctive split front windshield, and was slightly larger and considerably heavier than its predecessor. Its common nicknames are Breadloaf and Bay-window, or Loaf and Bay for short.[15] At 1.6 L and 35 kW (48 PS; 47 bhp) DIN, the engine was also slightly larger. The battery and electrical system was upgraded to 12 volts, making it incompatible with electric accessories from the previous generation. The new model also did away with the swing axle rear suspension and transfer boxes previously used to raise ride height. Instead, half-shaft axles fitted with constant velocity joints raised ride height without the wild changes in camber of the Beetle-based swing axle suspension. The updated Bus transaxle is usually sought after by off-road racers using air-cooled Volkswagen components.

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1968 VW Beetle

The beloved classic – Dubbed “The People’s Car”.

Some information via Wiki:

For 1967, a yet-again larger-displacement engine was made available: 1500cc, 53 hp (40 kW; 54 PS) at 4,200 rpm. 1200 and 1300 engines continued to be available, as many markets based their taxation on engine size. 1500cc Beetles were equipped with front disc brakes and were identified with a “VW 1500” badge on the engine lid. North America received the 1500 engine as standard equipment, but did not receive front disc brakes. These models were identified by a “Volkswagen” badge on the engine lid.
1968 was a year of major change. The most noticeable of which were the new larger, higher mounted C-section bumpers. At the rear, new larger taillamps were adopted and were able to accommodate backup lamps, which were previously separate bumper-mounted units. Beetles worldwide received the ’67 North American style vertical headlamp placement, but with replaceable-bulb headlamps compliant with ECE regulations rather than the US sealed beams. Other improvements were a new outside gas filler with spring-loaded flap, eliminating the need to open the trunk to refuel.

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